Andy HarrisAndy Harris – MD1

Current Position: US Representative for MD District 1 since 2011
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2021 US Senator
Former Position(s): State Senator from 1999 – 2011

Featured Quote: 
I’m proud to have joined @RepTenneyon an amicus brief to SCOTUS to overturn the NY restrictive concealed carry law. A successful ruling in this case could very well overturn the impossibly restrictive “good cause” requirements to obtain a CC license in many states including MD.

Featured Video: 
Maryland Rep. Andy Harris Says President Trump Isn’t Responsible For US Capitol Riots

WASHINGTON, DC: Rep. Andy Harris, M.D. (MD-01) today joined Rep. Ralph Norman (R-SC-05) in introducing an article of impeachment against Secretary of State Anthony Blinken.  This action is in direct response to predictable, yet egregiously inexcusable failures of planning, execution, and leadership in Afghanistan that have led to the loss of American lives, endangered countless other American and allied lives, and set a horrible precedent on the international stage.  A full copy of the impeachment resolution can be viewed here.

Congressman Harris issued the following statement:

“The Biden Administration’s handling of Afghanistan has been an unmitigated catastrophe.  This preventable tragedy rests solely on the shoulders of President Biden and his Administration, and in particular the Secretary of State.  We are the most powerful nation on the planet, and we must make clear to the Taliban that we will stay to get our people out as long as that takes.  Secretary Blinken’s complete and utter failure of managing this avoidable catastrophe makes him unfit for leadership, and I hope my colleagues will join me in pushing for his removal.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MD District 1 since 2011
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2021 US Senator
Former Position(s): State Senator from 1999 – 2011

Featured Quote: 
I’m proud to have joined @RepTenneyon an amicus brief to SCOTUS to overturn the NY restrictive concealed carry law. A successful ruling in this case could very well overturn the impossibly restrictive “good cause” requirements to obtain a CC license in many states including MD.

Featured Video: 
Maryland Rep. Andy Harris Says President Trump Isn’t Responsible For US Capitol Riots

News

WASHINGTON, DC: Rep. Andy Harris, M.D. (MD-01) today joined Rep. Ralph Norman (R-SC-05) in introducing an article of impeachment against Secretary of State Anthony Blinken.  This action is in direct response to predictable, yet egregiously inexcusable failures of planning, execution, and leadership in Afghanistan that have led to the loss of American lives, endangered countless other American and allied lives, and set a horrible precedent on the international stage.  A full copy of the impeachment resolution can be viewed here.

Congressman Harris issued the following statement:

“The Biden Administration’s handling of Afghanistan has been an unmitigated catastrophe.  This preventable tragedy rests solely on the shoulders of President Biden and his Administration, and in particular the Secretary of State.  We are the most powerful nation on the planet, and we must make clear to the Taliban that we will stay to get our people out as long as that takes.  Secretary Blinken’s complete and utter failure of managing this avoidable catastrophe makes him unfit for leadership, and I hope my colleagues will join me in pushing for his removal.”

About

Andy Harris 1

Source: Government page

Born in Brooklyn in 1957, he studied medicine at Hopkins, where he continued to practice as an anesthesiologist for nearly three decades. Andy specialized in obstetric anesthesiology. Andy still practices part-time at Memorial Hospital in Easton, Maryland.

In 1988, Andy answered a recruitment call to fill a critical need for anesthesiologists in the Naval Reserve during the Reagan administration. He went on to establish and command The Johns Hopkins Medical Naval Reserve Unit.  In 1990, his unit was called up to active duty in order to assist with Operation Desert Shield (and later Operation Desert Storm) at Bethesda Naval Hospital.  Harris attained the rank of Commander (O-5) before leaving the Reserves after seventeen years.

Unhappy with the status quo in Annapolis, Andy decided to take on the establishment and run for the Maryland State Senate in 1998, where he served for 12 years.  Maryland’s First Congressional District first elected Andy to serve in the House of Representatives in 2010. He serves on the Committee on Appropriations and on the following subcommittees: Agriculture; and Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education.

Andy was married to his late wife, Cookie, for over 33 years, and he is the proud father of five children, stepfather of one, and grandfather to eight.  Andy lives with his wife, Nicole, their children and dog in Baltimore County during the school year and in Dorchester County the rest of the year.  In his free time, he enjoys spending time on the Chesapeake Bay with his family and repairing old cars with his sons.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

Chesapeake Bay Caucus

The caucus focuses on issues related to the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay, including water quality, conservation, resource management, recreation and economic development, as well as educating other members of Congress.

Chicken

The Congressional Chicken Caucus was formed to educate other Members of Congress about the history, contributions and concerns of the U.S. chicken industry, which emanate from a wide range of issues pertaining to food safety, trade, labor, immigration and the environment.  The Chicken Caucus provides a platform for discussing the role of government in addressing current and future industry challenges.

Coal

The Congressional Coal Caucus is made up of House members that recognize the importance of achieving a more energy-independent nation while also focusing on coal as a natural resource.

General Aviation

The General Aviation Caucus was created to inform Members and staff about the importance of general aviation to the nation’s economy and transportation system.

Hungarian

This bipartisan group of distinguished House members seeks to represent interests of Hungarian American constituents; foster bilateral relations between Hungary and United States; and protect the rights of Hungarian minorities in Europe.

GOP Doctors

The Caucus is composed of medical providers in Congress who work to develop patient centered, patient driven healthcare reforms focused on quality, access, affordability, portability, and choice.

Pro-Life

The Bipartisan Congressional Pro-Life Caucus works to eliminate taxpayer funding for abortion and preserve pro-life health care providers’ rights of conscience. The primary objective of the Caucus is to preserve the sanctity of life.

Republican Israel Caucus

The Republican Israel Caucus educates House members on current events, administration policies and regional issues related to Israel.  The group also co-hosts events on Middle East issues with policy experts, academics and members of the Jewish community.

Sportsmen’s

The Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus is the sportsmen’s ally and first line of defense in Washington promoting and protecting the rights of hunters, trappers and anglers.

Values Action Team

The Values Action Team is dedicated to building and strengthening relationships with citizens groups for the purpose of preserving traditional values and protecting the right to life.

Offices

Washington, DC Office

2334 Rayburn HOB
WashingtonDC 20515

9am-5pm Monday-Friday
Phone: 202-225-5311

Bel Air Office

15 East Churchville Road
Suite 102B
Bel AirMD 21014

By Appointment Only
Phone: 410-588-5670

Kent Island Office

100 Olde Point Village
Suite 101
ChesterMD 21619

By Appointment Only
Phone: 410-643-5425

Salisbury Office

100 East Main Street
Suite 702
SalisburyMD 21801

By Appointment Only

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

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Wikipedia Entry

Andrew Peter Harris (born January 25, 1957) is an American politician and physician who has been the U.S. Representative for Maryland’s 1st congressional district since 2011. The district includes the entire Eastern Shore, as well as several eastern exurbs of Baltimore. He is currently the only Republican member of Maryland’s congressional delegation. Harris previously served in the Maryland Senate.

Early life, education, and career

Harris’s father was Zoltán Harris, an anesthesiologist who was born in Miskolc, Hungary, in 1911 and emigrated to the United States in 1950; his mother, Irene (Koczerzuk), was born in Zarice, Poland.[2][3][4] Harris was born in New York, grew up in Queens, and attended Regis High School in Manhattan.[5]

Harris earned his B.S. in biology (1977) and his M.D. (1980) from The Johns Hopkins University. The University’s Bloomberg School of Hygiene and Public Health conferred the M.H.S. in 1995 in Health policy and management and also Health Finance & Management.[2]

Harris served in the Navy Medical Corps and the U.S. Naval Reserve as a lieutenant commander on active duty during Operation Desert Storm and currently serves as a commander.[2] He has worked as an anesthesiologist, as an associate professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine, and as chief of obstetric anesthesiology at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Harris also served as commanding officer for the Johns Hopkins Naval Reserve Medical Unit from 1989 to 1992.[2]

Maryland General Assembly

Harris was first elected to the Maryland Senate in 1998 for District 9, including part of Baltimore County.[6] He defeated his predecessor, Minority Leader F. Vernon Boozer, in the 1998 primary election.[7] A major factor in the race was Boozer’s role in derailing an attempt to ban partial-birth abortion a year earlier; the bill’s sponsor, fellow state senator Larry Haines, supported Harris’s primary bid.[8] In the general election he defeated Democratic challenger Anthony O. Blades.

His district was later redrawn to be District 7, representing parts of Harford counties, succeeding Norman Stone.[9] He defeated Democratic challenger Diane DeCarlo in the general election in 2002,[10] and from 2003 to 2006 served as the minority whip.[2] In 2006, he won re-election, this time defeating Patricia A. Foerster.[11] He was succeeded by J. B. Jennings.[12]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2008

Harris defeated incumbent Republican Wayne Gilchrest and State Senator E.J. Pipkin in the Republican primary for Maryland’s 1st congressional district.[13] Harris ran to the right of Gilchrest, one of the moderate Republicans in the House. He explained that he was upset with Gilchrest’s decision to support a Democrat-sponsored bill setting a timetable for troop withdrawal from Iraq and suspected that many of his constituents also felt that way. He was endorsed by the Club for Growth,[14] which raised nearly $250,000 for him,[15] and by former governor Bob Ehrlich,[16] seven of 10 state senators who represent parts of the district, and House Minority Leader Anthony O’Donnell.[17] His general election opponent Frank Kratovil criticized the Club for Growth’s policies, and Harris for having its support.[18] Gilchrest endorsed Kratovil for the general election.[19]

On paper, Harris had a strong advantage in the general election due to its Republican lean. Although Democrats and Republicans are nearly tied in registration, the district has a strong tinge of social conservatism that favors Republicans. It had been in Republican hands for all but 14 years since 1947, although Kratovil received a significant boost when Gilchrest endorsed him over Harris.[19]

On election night, Kratovil led Harris by 915 votes. After two rounds of counting absentee ballots, Kratovil’s lead grew to 2,000 votes. Forecasting that there was little chance for Harris to close the gap, most media outlets declared Kratovil the winner on the night of November 7.[20][21] Harris conceded on November 11.

Harris dominated his longtime base in Baltimore’s heavily Republican eastern suburbs, which account for most of the district’s share of Baltimore County. However, he failed to carry a single county on the Eastern Shore. Proving just how Republican this district still was, John McCain carried it with nearly 60 percent of the vote, which was his best showing in the state.

2010

Harris ran again in the 1st District in 2010. He defeated Rob Fisher, a conservative businessman, in the primary.

Harris’s primary win set up a rematch against Kratovil. Libertarian Richard James Davis and Independent Jack Wilson also ran. In the November 2 general election Harris defeated Kratovil by 14%.

2012

The National Journal‘s Cook Political Report named Harris one of the top 10 Republicans most vulnerable to redistricting in 2012, noting that Maryland Democrats could redraw Harris’s home in Cockeysville out of the 1st.[22] Instead, Roscoe Bartlett‘s 6th District was redrawn.[23] Most of Bartlett’s shares of Harford and Baltimore counties were drawn into the 1st, making this already strongly Republican district even more so.

Harris was re-elected to a second term, defeating Democratic challenger Wendy Rosen with 67 percent of the vote. Rosen had withdrawn from the race after being confronted with evidence that she’d voted in both Maryland and Florida in the 2006 and 2008 elections.[citation needed] Rosen had property in Florida, and Maryland law allowed property owners to vote in local elections even if they live elsewhere. However, her Florida voting registration reportedly also gave her access to state and federal elections there, which was not allowed by Maryland law.[24][25] However, at the time she withdrew, ballots had already been printed. John LaFerla, who had narrowly lost to Rosen in the primary, was endorsed as Rosen’s replacement, but could only be a write-in.

2014

Harris defeated Democratic nominee Bill Tilghman for a third term, taking over 70 percent of the vote.[26][27]

2016

Harris ran for reelection in 2016. In the Republican primary, he faced three challengers and won 78.4 percent of the vote.[28][29] Former Maryland state delegates member Mike Smigiel came in second place with 10.8 percent of the vote.[29][30] Smigiel ran because he opposed Harris’ strident opposition to marijuana decriminalization in the District of Columbia.[30][31]

In the general election, Harris won another term with 229,135 votes (67.8%),[32] defeating Democratic nominee Joe Werner, a “little-known Harford County attorney and perennial candidate”[33] who received 94,776 votes (28%).[32] Libertarian candidate Matt Beers received 14,207 votes (4.2%).[32] In February 2016, Harris was the first congressman to endorse candidate Ben Carson for the Republican nomination for president.[34] Carson dropped out two weeks later following a poor performance in the Super Tuesday March 1, 2016 primaries.[35]

2018

While Harris was running for reelection, the Washington Post ran a story accusing him of ethics violations.[36] In a letter to the Office of Congressional Ethics, Maryland Democratic Party Chair Kathleen Matthews alleged Harris might have violated ethics rules requiring members to report the source of spousal income and assets.[36] In the statement, Matthews said that it appeared that Andy Harris paid his wife thousands of dollars from his campaign, then tried to hide it from government ethics regulators.[36]

In response, the Harris campaign said the omission was a mistake and the congressman amended his filing once he became aware of the error.[36]

In the general election, Harris ran against Jesse Colvin and won with 60 percent of the vote.[37][38]

2020

Harris defeated Democratic nominee Mia Mason for a sixth term, taking over 63 percent of the vote.[39]

Committee assignments

In October 2015, Harris was named to serve on the Select Investigative Panel on Planned Parenthood.[40]

Caucus memberships

Political positions

According to Baltimore Magazine, Harris holds far-right political positions on many issues.[43]

Affordable Care Act

Harris opposes the Affordable Care Act and voted to repeal it.[44]

At a closed-door employee benefits briefing for new congressmen during the November 2010 freshman orientation, Harris was surprised to learn that the Federal employee health benefit plan would leave the new congressmen and their staffers without coverage until the following pay period, 28 days after inauguration. Concerned about this gap in coverage, he asked whether new government employees could purchase temporary coverage to fill this gap. “This is the only employer I’ve ever worked for where you don’t get coverage the first day you are employed,” he said through his spokeswoman, Anna Nix.[45][46] Through a spokesman, his defeated opponent, Frank Kratovil, re-phrased the statement, characterizing the original question as a “demand” for special treatment and for access to the benefits he opposed in the new law.[47] Furthermore, “Harris then asked if he could purchase insurance from the government to cover the gap,” added an aide, who was struck by the similarity to Harris’s request and the public option that he called “a gateway to socialized medicine“.[48]

Debt ceiling

On October 16, 2013, Harris voted against the motion to end the government shutdown and raise the debt ceiling.[49]

2020 presidential election

After Joe Biden won the 2020 presidential election and President Donald Trump refused to concede while making false claims of fraud, Harris defended Trump’s efforts to overturn the election.[50] Harris falsely claimed there were “large-scale voting irregularities” and “secret, unobserved vote counting in the swing states.”[50]

In December 2020, Harris was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives who signed an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election.[50] The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of the election held by another state.[51][52][53]

Storming of the Capitol

In an interview with WBAL-TV just after evacuating the Capitol after it was stormed, Harris downplayed the violence of the riot, saying “Obviously, later we heard there was a gunshot, but other than that, there was no indication that this was a truly violent protest, as violent as one as you would worry about.” Harris also said he understood the frustrations of the rioters and repeated false claims of election fraud.[43]

On January 6, 2021, after 2021 storming of the United States Capitol, Harris was involved in a verbal altercation with Rep. Al Lawson (D-FL) on the House floor after taking offense to Rep. Conor Lamb’s criticism of House Republicans for pushing unfounded conspiracy theories.[54] During an interview the next day, Harris falsely claimed that Leftist provocateurs were behind the storming of the Capitol.[43]

Foreign affairs

Harris has defended Hungarian leader Viktor Orbán, an authoritarian EU leader[55] and Vladimir Putin ally[56] who has pledged to turn his country into an “illiberal democracy“. Harris criticized the State Departments’ efforts to support free and independent media in the country.[57]

Opposition to D.C. cannabis reform

In 2014, Harris was the leading congressional critic of marijuana decriminalization in the District of Columbia bill, and led efforts in Congress to block decriminalization from taking effect.[58] Harris’s amendment led to a call from D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray to boycott tourism to Rep. Harris’s district and the boycott of Maryland’s 1st congressional district,[59] as well as an online campaign requesting that D.C. area businesses refuse him service at their establishments.[60] In November 2014, D.C. residents voted in favor of legalizing recreational cannabis for adults with 68% in favor.[61] Despite this, Harris said he would use “all resources available to a member of Congress to stop this action”.[62] On December 9, 2014, congressional leaders announced a deal on a spending bill that included language that will prohibit the D.C. referendum from taking effect. Harris said that “the Constitution gives Congress the ultimate oversight about what happens in the federal district.”[58] Harris says that he believes that cannabis is a gateway drug[63] and that it has no proven medicinal use.[64]

The online publication ATTN: wrote that one of Harris’ campaign contributors had a financial interest in keeping marijuana illegal. Harris’ third largest campaign donor is the pharmaceutical corporation Emergent BioSolutions, based in Rockville, Maryland. One of Emergent’s products is Epsil, advertised as “a fast-acting treatment that reduces the pain associated with oral mucositis,” which is a common complication of chemotherapy from cancer treatment. ATTN: wrote that according to medical studies, marijuana can reduce the adverse effects of chemotherapy in cancer patients, and substitute for the more dangerous opioids. In states where medical marijuana has been legalized, the number of pharmaceutical pain killers prescribed has dropped significantly.[65]

Maya Angelou

In 2016, Harris opposed legislation to rename a North Carolina post office in honor of poet Maya Angelou.[66] Harris said that her support for communism disqualified her for the honor. “She supported the Communist revolution in Cuba, and my parents escaped a communist country,” Harris explained.[66]

QAnon

In 2020, Harris voted “present” on a bipartisan bill to denounce QAnon, a far-right conspiracy theory. The bipartisan resolution passed 371–18 with Harris being the only “present” vote.[67]

Roy Moore

During the primary race of the 2017 special election to fill the vacated Senate seat of Jeff Sessions, Harris endorsed Roy Moore in his successful bid to defeat incumbent Sen. Luther Strange. Following the news of Moore’s sexual abuse scandal, Harris did not withdraw his endorsement, saying that he would continue to support Moore unless the allegations were proven to be true.[68]

COVID-19 response

Harris opposed stay-at-home orders in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. On May 2, 2020, he addressed protesters in Salisbury attempting to pressure Maryland governor Larry Hogan to lift restrictions, saying, “I am a physician. Let me tell you something: It is safe to begin to reopen Maryland.”[69]

Harris opposed prohibitions on indoor dining during the COVID-19 pandemic.[50]

Net neutrality

Harris does not support net neutrality, characterizing the FCC vote to remove net neutrality as “eliminating burdensome and unnecessary regulations.”[70]

Second impeachment of Donald Trump

Harris was one of four representatives who did not cast a vote regarding the second impeachment of Donald Trump on January 13, 2021.[71]

Foreign policy

In 2021, during a House vote on a measure condemning the Myanmar coup d’état that overwhelmingly passed, Harris was among fourteen Republican Representatives who voted against it, for reasons reported to be unclear.[72]

U.S. Capitol Police

In June 2021, Harris was among 21 House Republicans who voted against a resolution to give the Congressional Gold Medal to police officers who defended the U.S. Capitol on January 6.[73]

Electoral history

YearOfficeElectionSubjectPartyVotes%OpponentPartyVotes%OpponentPartyVotes%
1998Maryland Senate, District 9[74]GeneralAndy HarrisRepublican24,81461%Anthony O. BladesDemocratic15,78039%
2002Maryland Senate, District 7[75]GeneralAndy HarrisRepublican23,37457.8%Dianne DeCarloDemocratic16,99142.1%Write-ins440.1%
2006Maryland Senate, District 7[76]GeneralAndy HarrisRepublican23,45356.6%Patricia A. FoersterDemocratic17,97243.3%Write-ins350.1%
2008U.S. House of Representatives, MD-1[13]PrimaryAndy HarrisRepublican33,62743.4%Wayne GilchrestRepublican25,62433.1%E.J. PipkinRepublican15,70020.3%
2008U.S. House of Representatives, MD-1[77]GeneralFrank KratovilDemocratic177,06549.1%Andy HarrisRepublican174,21348.3%Richard James DavisLibertarian8,8732.5%Write-ins350.1%
2010U.S. House of Representatives, MD-1[78]GeneralAndy HarrisRepublican155,11854.1%Frank KratovilDemocratic120,40042.0%Richard James DavisLibertarian10,8763.8%Write-ins4180.15%
2012U.S. House of Representatives, MD-1GeneralAndy HarrisRepublican212,20463.4%Wendy RosenDemocratic92,81227.5%Muir Wayne BodaLibertarian12,8573.8%Write-ins17,8875.3%
2014U.S. House of Representatives, MD-1GeneralAndy HarrisRepublican176,34270.4%Bill TilghmanDemocratic73,84329.5%Write-ins2330.1%
2016U.S. House of Representatives, MD-1[79]GeneralAndy HarrisRepublican242,57467.0%Joe WernerDemocratic103,62228.6%Matt BeersLibertarian15,3704.2%Write-ins5310.1%
2018U.S. House of Representatives, MD-1[80]GeneralAndy HarrisRepublican183,66260.0%Jesse ColvinDemocratic116,63138.1%Jenica MartinLibertarian5,7441.9%Write-ins1490.0%
2020U.S. House of Representatives, MD-1[81]GeneralAndy HarrisRepublican250,90163.4%Mia MasonDemocratic143,87736.4%Write-ins7460.2%

Personal life

Harris was married for 30 years to Sylvia “Cookie” Harris, who died of a heart attack on August 28, 2014.[82] He and the late Mrs. Harris have five children. He remarried in July 2017 to Nicole Beus, a Baltimore County political and marketing consultant.[50][83]

Harris resides in Cockeysville, Maryland, and considered himself a “citizen-legislator,” having maintained his medical practice while in the State Senate.[84]

Harris has been an active member in the community as a member of the Knights of Columbus, an officer in the Thornleigh Neighborhood Improvement Association (vice-president, 1984–85; president, 1985–86), a member of the Board of Directors of the Sherwood Community Association, 1987–91, and served as Vice President of St. Joseph’s School Home-School Association from 1992 to 1994. Also, he has been on the Board of Directors of the Maryland Leadership Council, 1995–98, a member of the North Central Republican Club (treasurer, 1997–98; vice-president, 1998), and finally as a Delegate to the Republican Party National Convention, 2004. Harris has received the Dr. Henry P. and M. Page Laughlin Distinguished Public Officer Award from the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland in 2001.[84]

2021 gun incident

On January 21, 2021, Harris tried to covertly enter the floor of the United States House of Representatives with a gun, setting off a metal detector on his way in. This was in violation of new security measures adopted after the storming of the U.S. Capitol. Harris was not allowed to enter and returned 10 minutes later without a gun, at which point he was allowed entry.[85] U.S. Capitol Police began an investigation into the incident.[86]

Ivermectin prescriptions

In October 2021, Harris said on a radio show he prescribed ivermectin to constituents for treatment of COVID-19.[87] Currently, ivermectin is used to treat parasites in livestock and river blindness in humans. It is not approved by the FDA for treatment of COVID-19. During a discussion of vaccine mandates by the House Freedom Caucus in November 2021, Harris said that a complaint was filed against him with a physicians board for prescribing ivermectin.[88]

See also

References

  1. ^ “Republican Women of Baltimore County – Leadership”. Retrieved May 9, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e CongressmanAndy Harris: Biography. Retrieved September 29, 2017.
  3. ^ “Rep. Andy Harris’s unexplained “Gulag story. October 19, 2018.
  4. ^ “Irene Koczerzuk Harris”.
  5. ^ Memoli, Mike. “Mr. Harris Goes to Washington”. Regis Alumni News. 75 (2 (Winter 2011)): 10–11. Archived from the original on December 1, 2016. Retrieved November 30, 2016.
  6. ^ Maryland State Board of Elections. “1998 Gubernatorial Election”. state.md.us. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  7. ^ Maryland State Board of Elections. “1998 Gubernatorial Election”. state.md.us. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  8. ^ Partial Birth’ Ban Set to Pass in Md”. The Washington Post. March 11, 1999.
  9. ^ “Our Campaigns – MD State Senate 7 Race – Nov 05, 2002”. ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  10. ^ Maryland State Board of Elections. “2002 Gubernatorial Election”. state.md.us. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  11. ^ Maryland State Board of Elections. “Official 2006 Gubernatorial General Election results for State Senator”. state.md.us. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  12. ^ “Our Campaigns – MD State Senate 7 Race – Nov 07, 2006”. ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  13. ^ a b “Representative in Congress Results”. Maryland State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on April 9, 2008. Retrieved April 11, 2008.
  14. ^ Club for Growth Endorses Andy Harris Archived September 28, 2007, at the Wayback Machine Andy Harris For Congress press release. August 13, 2007. Retrieved August 17, 2007.
  15. ^ OpenSecrets.org. Center for Responsive Politics
  16. ^ Ehrlich supports Harris for seat Associated Press, Washington Times. October 19, 2007. Retrieved October 19, 2007.
  17. ^ Eleven Republican Incumbents Have to Watch Their Backs in House Primaries By CQ Staff. October 2, 2007. Retrieved October 19, 2007.
  18. ^ Anti-tax group’s support not paying dividends Politico
  19. ^ a b Gilchrest crosses party lines, endorses Democrat Kratovil, even cutting an ad for him[permanent dead link] Baltimore Sun
  20. ^ “AP: Kratovil Winner Of 1st District Seat”. WJZ-TV. Archived from the original on November 13, 2008. Retrieved November 8, 2008.
  21. ^ “Maryland’s 1st District”. CNN. Archived from the original on November 7, 2008. Retrieved November 8, 2008.
  22. ^ David Wasserman and Julia Edwards (April 15, 2011). “Top 10 Republicans Most Vulnerable to Redistricting”. Cook Political Report. National Journal. Archived from the original on May 1, 2011. Retrieved April 25, 2011.
  23. ^ John Fritze, “Delaney Defeats Bartlett in the 6th District”, Baltimore Sun, November 7, 2012.
  24. ^ Brown, Matthew Hay (September 14, 2012). “Democrat withdraws from 1st District congressional race after allegations she voted in two states”. The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved September 15, 2012.
  25. ^ “The lesson of Wendy Rosen”. The Baltimore Sun. September 11, 2012. Retrieved September 15, 2012.
  26. ^ Cox, Jeremy. “Andy Harris re-elected in landslide”. The Daily Times. Retrieved September 23, 2020.
  27. ^ “WBOC’s 2014 Maryland Primary Election Results”. WBOC 16. November 6, 2014. Retrieved September 23, 2020.
  28. ^ Holland, Liz. “Andy Harris not worried about GOP challenges in primary”. The Daily Times. Retrieved September 23, 2020.
  29. ^ a b “Maryland Primary Election Results 2016”. The New York Times. September 29, 2016. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 23, 2020.
  30. ^ a b Rachel Kurzius, Sorry, D.C.—Andy Harris Won His Primary Race Archived March 10, 2017, at the Wayback Machine, DCist (April 27, 2016).
  31. ^ Jacobs, Benjamin (March 19, 2015). “Washington DC’s legal weed debate spills over into Maryland politics”. The Guardian. Retrieved March 21, 2015.
  32. ^ a b c Maryland U.S. House 1st District: Results: Andy Harris Wins, New York Times (December 13, 2016).
  33. ^ Benjamin Freed, Activists Tried to Defeat the Maryland Congressman Who Messed With DC’s Pot Laws. Here’s Why They Failed, Washingtonian (April 27, 2016).
  34. ^ Cheney, Kyle (February 17, 2016). “Ben Carson gets his first congressional endorsement”. Politico. Retrieved February 17, 2016.
  35. ^ Robert Costa; Ben Terris (March 2, 2016). “Ben Carson tells supporters he sees no ‘path forward’ for presidential campaign”. The Washington Post.
  36. ^ a b c d Hernández, Arelis R. “Rep. Andy Harris accused of ethical violation for failing to disclose wife’s income”. Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved September 23, 2020.
  37. ^ Hernández, Arelis R. “Meet the Democrat challenging Rep. Andy Harris, Maryland’s only Republican in Congress”. Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved September 23, 2020.
  38. ^ “Maryland Election Results: First House District”. The New York Times. January 28, 2019. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 23, 2020.
  39. ^ “Official 2020 Presidential General Election results for Representative in Congress”. Maryland State Board of Elections. Retrieved February 13, 2021.
  40. ^ Paul Kane (October 23, 2015). “Boehner’s next select committee, focusing on Planned Parenthood, to be led by Marsha Blackburn”. Washington Post. Retrieved October 23, 2015.
  41. ^ “What is the House Freedom Caucus, and who’s in it?”. Pew Research Center. October 20, 2015. Retrieved October 26, 2017.
  42. ^ “Member List”. Republican Study Committee. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  43. ^ a b c Cassie, Ron Cassie (April 12, 2021). “Does Andy Harris Represent the Future or End of the Maryland GOP?”. Baltimore Magazine. Retrieved September 28, 2021.
  44. ^ Orman, Shelley (July 28, 2017). “Repealing ‘Obamacare’ is dead. What’s next for Marylanders?”. WBFF. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  45. ^ “Republican Rep.-Elect Refutes Claim He Lost It Over Congressional Health Care Rules”. Fox News. November 17, 2010.
  46. ^ Condon, Stephanie (November 16, 2010). “House GOP Freshman Demands Gov’t Health Care”. CBS News.
  47. ^ Paul West, “Rep.-elect Harris snagged in health care flap,” The Baltimore Sun, Nov. 16, 2010.
  48. ^ Glen Thrush, “GOP frosh: Where’s my health care?Politico, Nov. 15, 2010.
  49. ^ Washington Post, October 16/17, 2013. “Votes to end the government shutdown”.
  50. ^ a b c d e “As what he once pledged would be his last term nears, Rep. Andy Harris stays in step with Trump”. Baltimore Sun. December 2020.
  51. ^ Liptak, Adam (December 11, 2020). “Supreme Court Rejects Texas Suit Seeking to Subvert Election”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  52. ^ “Order in Pending Case” (PDF). Supreme Court of the United States. December 11, 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  53. ^ Diaz, Daniella. “Brief from 126 Republicans supporting Texas lawsuit in Supreme Court”. CNN. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  54. ^ Bella, Timothy; Beachum, Lateshia. Sit down!’ ‘No, you sit down!’ Democrat’s speech nearly triggers fistfight on House floor”. Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  55. ^ Dordevic, Igor (October 25, 2020). “Viktor Orbán’s Authoritarian Playbook”. Atlantic Sentinel.
  56. ^ Janjevic, Darko. “Vladimir Putin and Viktor Orban’s special relationship”. DW. Retrieved January 23, 2021.
  57. ^ Rodricks, Dan (March 4, 2018). “Rep. Andy Harris supporting Putin pal in Hungary”. The Baltimore Sun. Baltimore.
  58. ^ a b Davis, Aaron; O’Keefe, Ed (December 9, 2014). “Congressional spending deal blocks pot legalization in D.C.” Washington Post. Retrieved December 10, 2014.
  59. ^ DeBonis, Mike (July 2, 2014). “D.C. residents urged to boycott Md. shore to protest congressman’s marijuana move”. Washington Post. Retrieved July 14, 2014.
  60. ^ “Blacklist Andy Harris – A District of Columbia Protest”. Retrieved December 29, 2014.
  61. ^ Ferner, Matt (November 4, 2014). “Washington, D.C. Votes To Legalize Recreational Marijuana”. HuffPo. Retrieved November 5, 2014.
  62. ^ Davis, Aaron (November 5, 2014). “House Republican vows to upend D.C. ballot measure legalizing marijuana”. Washington Post. Retrieved November 5, 2014.
  63. ^ Raju, Manu; Topaz, Jonathan. “D.C. pot fight puts GOP in an awkward spot”. politico.com. Retrieved December 11, 2014.
  64. ^ “Rep. Harris Debates Medical Marijuana on House Floor (5/29/14) | Congressman Andy Harris”. Harris.house.gov. May 30, 2014. Retrieved July 23, 2015.
  65. ^ Matthew Segal (December 11, 2014). “One Congressman Just Ruined Legalized Marijuana in DC For Everyone. Here’s Why”. ATTN. Retrieved July 23, 2015.
  66. ^ a b Fritze, John (March 1, 2016). “Rep. Andy Harris votes against naming post office after Maya Angelou”. Baltimore Sun. Retrieved March 3, 2016.
  67. ^ “Roll Call 218 Roll Call 218, Bill Number: H. Res. 1154, 116th Congress, 2nd Session”. October 2, 2020.
  68. ^ “Rep. Andy Harris of Maryland and Virginia Senate hopeful Corey Steward endorsed Roy Moore. Now What?”. November 13, 2017. Retrieved November 18, 2017.
  69. ^ Nirappil, Fenit; Schmidt, Samantha; Ruane, Michael E. (May 2, 2020). “Military jets salute workers on front line as more coronavirus cases and deaths are reported”. Washington Post. Retrieved May 13, 2020.
  70. ^ “Response of congressman Andy Harris to net neutrality petition”. Imgur. Retrieved May 29, 2018.
  71. ^ Cai, Weiyi; Daniel, Annie; Gamio, Lazaro; Parlapiano, Alicia (January 13, 2021). “Impeachment Results: How Democrats and Republicans Voted”. The New York Times.
  72. ^ Diaz, Daniella; Wilson, Kristin (March 19, 2021). “14 House Republicans vote against a measure condemning military coup in Myanmar”. CNN. Retrieved March 24, 2021.
  73. ^ Grayer, Annie; Wilson, Kristin (June 16, 2021). “21 Republicans vote no on bill to award Congressional Gold Medal for January 6 police officers”. CNN. Retrieved June 16, 2021.
  74. ^ “State Senate Results”. Maryland State Board of Elections. Retrieved on Oct 9, 2007
  75. ^ “State Senate Results”. Maryland State Board of Elections. Retrieved on Oct 9, 2007
  76. ^ “State Senate Results”. Maryland State Board of Elections. Retrieved on Oct 9, 2007
  77. ^ “Representative in Congress Results”. Maryland State Board of Elections. Retrieved June 14, 2009.
  78. ^ “Representative in Congress Results”. Maryland State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 6, 2011.
  79. ^ “Representative in Congress Results”. Maryland State Board of Elections. Retrieved April 1, 2017.
  80. ^ “Representative in Congress Results”. Maryland State Board of Elections. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  81. ^ “Representative in Congress Results”. Maryland State Board of Elections. Retrieved December 4, 2020.
  82. ^ Rep. Andy Harris’ wife dies after heart attack, WBALTV
  83. ^ “Rep. Andy Harris accused of ethical violation for failing to disclose wife’s income”. Washington Post. October 17, 2018.
  84. ^ a b Maryland Senate Archives Biography
  85. ^ “GOP Rep. Andy Harris Tries to Bring Gun into House Chamber”. January 21, 2021.
  86. ^ Barker, Jeff. “U.S. Capitol Police investigate after report Rep. Andy Harris brought gun to House chamber checkpoint”. Baltimore Sun. Retrieved January 22, 2021.
  87. ^ https://www.baltimoresun.com/coronavirus/bs-md-20211021-a5di4kfddfetdfqa37u2pvzrfe-story.html
  88. ^ Barker, Jeff (November 16, 2021). “Rep. Andy Harris, an anesthesiologist, says complaint was filed against him for prescribing ivermectin to treat COVID-19”. The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved November 16, 2021.

External links

Maryland Senate
Preceded by

Member of the Maryland Senate
from the 9th district

1998–2003
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Member of the Maryland Senate
from the 7th district

2003–2011
Succeeded by

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Maryland’s 1st congressional district

2011–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
138th
Succeeded by

Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

  • Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure
    • Subcommittee on Coast Guard & Maritime Transportation
    • Subcommittee on highways and transit
    • Subcommittee on water resources & Environment

In October 2015, Harris was named to serve on the Select Investigative Panel on Planned Parenthood.

Legislation

Learn more about legislation sponsored and co-sponsored by Congressman Harris.

Issues

X
Dutch RuppersbergerDutch Ruppersberger- MD2

Current Position: US Representative for MD District 2 since 2003
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 US Representative
Former Position(s): Baltimore County Executive from 1994 – 2002

Featured Quote: 
Kudos to @Simone_Biles for prioritizing her mental health above all. Her courage represents the USA as much as any gold medal.

Featured Video: 
Dutch Ruppersberger unveils violence prevention bill

Ruppersberger Issues Statement on Collapse of Afghanistan Government
Government WebsiteAugust 16, 2021 (Short)

(Washington, DC) – Congressman C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, a Defense Appropriator in the U.S. House of Representatives, today released the following statement on the situation in Afghanistan:

“President Biden made a difficult decision to move forward with U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan with the backing of the American people and keeping with the previous Administration’s negotiated May 1 deadline. Now, the immediate safety and security of all U.S. personnel on the ground in Afghanistan must be our number one priority and I support recent decisions by the President to deploy additional forces to Kabul to facilitate the safe departure of our teammates, including our allies and partners.

Although a Taliban advance in Afghanistan leading up to and following our departure was a well-stated possibility in many hearings and policy conversations in Washington over the last year, any amount of foresight and planning does not make their rapid advance across the country any less painful. Especially to those, many of whom I represent in Congress, who have deployed and fought for our American values in Afghanistan over the last 20 years and lost loved ones and dear friends. The country will never forget your sacrifice.

It is my expectation that Members of Congress will receive a briefing from the Administration to detail the circumstances surrounding the swift advance of the Taliban. Many questions will be asked at that time and in the days ahead of what we could have done better or planned for more vigorously. There is no question about the difficulty that lies ahead of us in ensuring we continue to support our allies and partners in the region. We must do everything in our power to protect those Afghans who are vulnerable under any Taliban regime – most importantly women and children – and we must continue to expeditiously relocate those who have assisted U.S. efforts.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MD District 2 since 2003
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 US Representative
Former Position(s): Baltimore County Executive from 1994 – 2002

Featured Quote: 
Kudos to @Simone_Biles for prioritizing her mental health above all. Her courage represents the USA as much as any gold medal.

Featured Video: 
Dutch Ruppersberger unveils violence prevention bill

News

Ruppersberger Issues Statement on Collapse of Afghanistan Government
Government WebsiteAugust 16, 2021 (Short)

(Washington, DC) – Congressman C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, a Defense Appropriator in the U.S. House of Representatives, today released the following statement on the situation in Afghanistan:

“President Biden made a difficult decision to move forward with U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan with the backing of the American people and keeping with the previous Administration’s negotiated May 1 deadline. Now, the immediate safety and security of all U.S. personnel on the ground in Afghanistan must be our number one priority and I support recent decisions by the President to deploy additional forces to Kabul to facilitate the safe departure of our teammates, including our allies and partners.

Although a Taliban advance in Afghanistan leading up to and following our departure was a well-stated possibility in many hearings and policy conversations in Washington over the last year, any amount of foresight and planning does not make their rapid advance across the country any less painful. Especially to those, many of whom I represent in Congress, who have deployed and fought for our American values in Afghanistan over the last 20 years and lost loved ones and dear friends. The country will never forget your sacrifice.

It is my expectation that Members of Congress will receive a briefing from the Administration to detail the circumstances surrounding the swift advance of the Taliban. Many questions will be asked at that time and in the days ahead of what we could have done better or planned for more vigorously. There is no question about the difficulty that lies ahead of us in ensuring we continue to support our allies and partners in the region. We must do everything in our power to protect those Afghans who are vulnerable under any Taliban regime – most importantly women and children – and we must continue to expeditiously relocate those who have assisted U.S. efforts.”

Twitter

About

Dutch Ruppersberger 1

Source: Government page

The assignment comes after a committee-record 12 years serving on the House Intelligence Committee, including four as Ranking Member. Congressman Ruppersberger was the first Democratic freshman ever appointed to the committee, which oversees the collection and analysis of intelligence from around the world to ensure our national security and prevent potential crisis situations — especially terrorist activity. He traveled to more than 50 countries including Iraq, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Yemen, China and Venezuela during his time on the committee.

On the committee, he developed a reputation for bipartisan leadership with then-Chairman and Republican Mike Rogers.  Beginning in 2011, the pair worked together to pass five intelligence authorization bills over four years — after a 6-year period without one — as well as bipartisan cybersecurity legislation. In 2015, they became the first dual recipients of the prestigious William Oliver Baker Award from the nonpartisan Intelligence and National Security Alliance for their pragmatic leadership.

Congressman Ruppersberger previously served on the House Government Reform and House Armed Services Committees, where he worked to help keep our country safe and make sure our veterans at home, as well as our warfighters on the frontlines, have the resources they need.

Maryland’s 2nd District includes parts of Baltimore City as well as Baltimore, Anne Arundel, Harford and Howard Counties. It is a vital center of trade and commerce for the state and national economy and includes the Port of Baltimore and the hundreds of businesses and manufacturing concerns dependent on it. The 2nd District is also home to the National Security Agency, Fort Meade, federal Cyber Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, the Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay and other installations essential to the country’s national security.

Creating jobs and improving Maryland’s economy is one of Congressman Ruppersberger’s top priorities. He is working hard to help middle-class Marylanders achieve more than just making ends meet. The Congressman is also fighting to keep our country safe and get our first responders the funds they need to protect our communities and our families.

A former assistant state’s attorney in Baltimore County, Congressman Ruppersberger decided to run for office after a near-fatal car accident while investigating a drug trafficking case. Thanks to the dedication of doctors at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, Congressman Ruppersberger survived and began campaigning for office to assist Shock Trauma after they saved his life. He remains an active supporter of the hospital, serving as Vice Chairman of its Board of Visitors. He also serves as Vice Chairman of the Board of Visitors at the United States Naval Academy.

Congressman Ruppersberger has served in public office for more than 34 years. He was elected to the Baltimore County Council in 1985 and again in 1989, chosen twice as council chairman. He was elected Baltimore County Executive in 1994 and 1998, and, under his leadership, the county was named one of the nation’s four best-managed counties by Governing Magazine. The county achieved three AAA bond ratings and staggering job growth during his administration.

A native of Baltimore City, Congressman Ruppersberger spent his summers as a lifeguard and police officer in Ocean City, Md. He attended Baltimore City College and the University of Maryland College Park, where he played lacrosse. He earned his Juris Doctorate from the University of Baltimore Law School.

The Congressman has been married for 50 years to his high school sweetheart, the former Kay Murphy. Together they have two grown children and five grandchildren.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

  • Congressional NextGen 9-1-1 Caucus
  • United States Congressional International Conservation Caucus
  • U.S.-Japan Caucus

Offices

D.C. Office

2206 Rayburn Building
Washington, D.C.DC 20515
202-225-3061 Phone
202-225-3094 Fax

Timonium Office

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375 W. Padonia Rd
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TimoniumMD 21093
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Wikipedia Entry

Charles Albert “Dutch” Ruppersberger III (/ˈrpərsˌbɜːrɡər/ ROOP-ərs-berg-ər; born January 31, 1946) is an American lawyer and politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Maryland’s 2nd congressional district since 2003. A member of the Democratic Party, he previously served as an Assistant State Attorney of Maryland from 1972 to 1980, a Baltimore County Councilman from 1985 to 1994, and the Baltimore County Executive from 1994 until 2002. He was the Ranking Member of the United States House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence from 2011 to 2015.

Early life, education and career

Ruppersberger was born in Baltimore, the son of Margaret “Peggy” (née Wilson) and Charles Albert “Al” Ruppersberger, Jr. He is of part German descent.[1] He graduated from Baltimore City College and attended the University of Maryland, College Park, where he played lacrosse. He earned his Juris Doctor (JD) from the University of Baltimore School of Law.[citation needed]

Ruppersberger began his career as a Baltimore County Assistant State’s Attorney. He was soon promoted to the Chief of the State’s Attorney Office Investigative Division, pursuing organized crime, political corruption, and drug trafficking. He was elected to the Baltimore County Council in 1985 and again in 1989, chosen twice as Council Chairman. In 1994 and again in 1998, he was elected Baltimore County Executive.

U.S. House of Representatives

Committee assignments

Previous

Caucus memberships

Party leadership

Ruppersberger calls on Congress to create a cabinet level intelligence director on August 3, 2004.

Ruppersberger was the first Democrat freshman to be appointed to the House Intelligence Committee. He was named to this committee because his district is home to the National Security Agency. From January 3, 2011 to January 3, 2015, he served as this committee’s ranking Democrat. The position placed Ruppersberger on the elite “Gang of Eight“, which refers to the Chairs and Ranking Members of the U.S. House and Senate Intelligence Committees along with the Senate Majority Leader, Senate Minority Leader, House Speaker and House Minority Leader. By law, the president must keep the Gang of Eight informed of the country’s most secret intelligence activities to maintain proper oversight.

Shock trauma

Ruppersberger decided to run for office after a near-fatal car accident while investigating a drug trafficking case. Ruppersberger survived and began campaigning. He served as vice chairman on the board of visitors for the hospital which saved his life. He also serves on the United States Naval Academy Board of Visitors.[citation needed]

Agriculture

In September 2019, Ruppersberger was one of nine lawmakers who signed a letter to Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue urging him to reconsider a proposed rule change that would affect the number of Americans that qualified for SNAP, noting that it would be “Maryland’s most vulnerable residents, including children, seniors, and people with disabilities, who would suffer the painful consequences of unnecessary and preventable hunger.”[5]

Operation Hero Miles

In 2003, Ruppersberger created the national “Hero Miles” program to allow Americans to donate their frequent flyer miles to wounded warriors recovering at military or Veterans Administration medical centers as well as to friends and family visiting them. In 2012, he authored legislation expanding the program to enable Americans to donate their hotel reward points to military families. Both the “Hero Miles” and “Hotels for Heroes” programs are administered by Fisher House, a nonprofit organization that opens its homes to military families visiting their injured loved ones at hospitals across the country.[6] He won a Charles Dick Medal of Merit in 2004 for this initiative, thus becoming the last Marylander to win this award, which was previously awarded to U.S. Representative Beverly Byron (1992), State Senator John Astle (1993), U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski (1994), U.S. Representative Roscoe Bartlett (1998) and State Delegate Peter Franchot (1999).

Municipal finance

Ruppersberger is an advocate of municipal finance and tax-exempt municipal bonds. In 2013, he joined with U.S. Representative Randy Hultgren in securing the signatures of 137 other House Republicans and Democrats in a letter to congressional leaders asking that they “reject any proposal to cap or eliminate the deduction on tax-exempt municipal bonds used to finance the vast majority of infrastructure projects in America’s communities.”[7] The two circulated a similar letter in 2015[8] and formed the Municipal Finance Caucus in 2016.[9]

Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act

Ruppersberger, along with Republican Mike Rogers from Michigan, co-sponsored the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, designed to increase intelligence sharing between private cyber security firms and government agencies.[10] More than 60 businesses and trade organizations submitted letters of support including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Time Warner, Verizon and AT&T, IBM and Intel.[11] Despite several amendments to address privacy concerns, some groups, such as the Electronic Frontier Foundation, have criticized the act for a lack of civil liberties protections, claiming that it authorizes government surveillance of private communications and allows companies to hand over large amounts of personal information on their clients without a warrant or judicial oversight, and thereby creates a cybersecurity loophole in existing privacy laws, such as the Wiretap Act and the Electronic Communications Privacy Act.[12] CISPA passed the House of Representatives on April 26, 2012.[13] It was reintroduced into the House on February 13, 2013, and passed on April 18, 2013, by a bipartisan vote of 288–127. Of the 92 Democrats who supported the bill, many of them cited significant privacy improvements over the 2012 version.[14]

Biosecurity

On October 19, 2017 at the Emergent Biosolutions manufacturing facility in Maryland, Ruppersberger received the Congressional Biosecurity Champion Award from the Alliance for Biosecurity, a D.C.-based public-interest organization, for “his leadership and actions taken in Congress to improve U.S. national security, preparedness and response for biosecurity threats.” He was one of eight Members of Congress that received the award.[15]

Syria

Following President Trump launching an airstrike on Syria in April 2017, Ruppersberger expressed hope that “Russia and Iran stand by the international community in condemning Assad’s use of chemical weapons and cooperate in finding an appropriate way forward” and that the United States needed “a larger, thoughtful strategy to address the situation in Syria, including the defeat of ISIS.”[16]

In October 2019, Ruppersberger commented that he was concerned “about the instability now in the entire Middle East, and now we’re really helping to make Russia even stronger in the Middle East” and said that the United States was receiving comments from American troops expressing their concern and embarrassment over leaving behind the Kurds.[17]

Yemeni civil war

In December 2018, The Young Turks reported that Ruppersberger, “one of five Democrats who joined the majority of House Republicans to block debate on the war in Yemen, had met with Saudi officials and foreign agents representing them on numerous occasions”.[18][unreliable source?]

In February 2019, Ruppersberger voted for Ro Khanna’s resolution which directs the removal of United States Armed Forces from hostilities in the Republic of Yemen that have not been authorized by Congress. Cosponsors

Political campaigns

Barred from a third term as county executive, Ruppersberger opted to run for Congress in 2002 after 2nd district Congressman Bob Ehrlich made what turned out to be a successful run for governor. The Maryland General Assembly significantly altered the 2nd by shifting most of its share of Harford County to the 1st and 6th districts. In its place, the legislature added a heavily Democratic portion of Baltimore City that had previously been in the 1st district. This turned the 2nd from a swing district into a strongly Democratic district.[citation needed]

An August 2011 editorial by The Washington Post described the 2nd district as “curlicue territories strung together by impossibly delicate tendrils of land” and “a crazy-quilt confection drawn for the express purpose of ousting the incumbent at the time, Rep. (and later Gov.) Robert L. “Bob” Ehrlich Jr., a Republican, and installing C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, a Democrat who still holds the job.”[19] He defeated Republican opponent Helen Delich Bentley, who had represented the 2nd district from 1985 to 1995, with 55 percent of the vote. He has never faced another close contest since then and has been reelected seven times.

On April 10, 2013, the Baltimore Sun reported that Ruppersberger was considering a run for governor of Maryland in 2014.[20] In January 2014, he announced that he would not run for governor, but instead would seek reelection to the House of Representatives.[21]

Electoral history

YearOfficeElectionSubjectPartyVotes%OpponentPartyVotes%
1994Baltimore County ExecutiveGeneralDutch RuppersbergerDemocraticN/AN/ARoger B. HaydenRepublicanN/AN/A
1998Baltimore County ExecutiveGeneralDutch RuppersbergerDemocratic166,48270.47Republican69,44929.4
2002Maryland’s 2nd congressional districtGeneralDutch RuppersbergerDemocratic105,71854.16Helen Delich BentleyRepublican88,95445.57
2004Maryland’s 2nd congressional districtGeneralDutch RuppersbergerDemocratic164,75166.62Republican75,81230.66
2006Maryland’s 2nd congressional districtGeneralDutch RuppersbergerDemocratic135,81869.21Jimmy MathisRepublican60,19530.68
2008Maryland’s 2nd congressional districtGeneralDutch RuppersbergerDemocratic198,57871.9Richard Pryce MatthewsRepublican68,56124.8
2010Maryland’s 2nd congressional districtGeneralDutch RuppersbergerDemocratic134,13364.21Marcelo CardarelliRepublican69,52333.28
2012Maryland’s 2nd congressional districtGeneralDutch RuppersbergerDemocratic194,08865.6Nancy C. JacobsRepublican92,07131.1
2014Maryland’s 2nd congressional districtGeneralDutch RuppersbergerDemocratic115,58661.3David BanachRepublican67,99536.0
2016Maryland’s 2nd congressional districtGeneralDutch RuppersbergerDemocratic172.32462.2Patrick L. McDonoughRepublican92.09933.3
2018Maryland’s 2nd congressional districtGeneralDutch RuppersbergerDemocratic167,20166.0Elizabeth MatoryRepublican77,78230.7
2020Maryland’s 2nd congressional districtGeneralDutch RuppersbergerDemocratic224,83667.7Johnny Ray SallingRepublican106,35532.0

Personal life

Ruppersberger married his high school sweetheart in 1971 and has two grown children, Cory and Jill, and three grandchildren.[22]

References

  1. ^ “dutch ruppersberger”. Freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com. Retrieved August 13, 2014.
  2. ^ “Members”. Congressional NextGen 9-1-1 Caucus. Retrieved June 8, 2018.
  3. ^ “Our Members”. U.S. House of Representatives International Conservation Caucus. Archived from the original on August 1, 2018. Retrieved August 5, 2018.
  4. ^ “Members”. U.S. – Japan Caucus. Retrieved December 14, 2018.
  5. ^ Stubbs, Kathleen (October 5, 2019). “Maryland delegation asks USDA to reconsider SNAP changes”. mont.thesentinel.com.
  6. ^ “Ruppersberger Receives Medal For ‘Operation Hero Miles. WBAL-TV. Retrieved August 17, 2011.[permanent dead link]
  7. ^ “Hultgren, Ruppersberger Lead Bipartisan Effort to Keep Municipal Bonds Tax-Exempt”. Congressman Randy Hultgren. July 11, 2013. Archived from the original on February 23, 2017. Retrieved February 22, 2017.
  8. ^ “Hultgren, Ruppersberger Lead Bipartisan Effort to Protect Municipal Finance Tax Exemption”. Congressman Randy Hultgren. April 15, 2015. Archived from the original on February 23, 2017. Retrieved February 22, 2017.
  9. ^ “Ruppersberger, Hultgren Launch Bipartisan Caucus to Promote Investment in Local Communities”. Congressman C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger. March 1, 2016. Retrieved February 22, 2017.
  10. ^ “House to take up cybersecurity bill with revisions”. Reuters. April 11, 2012.
  11. ^ “H.R. 624 – Letters of Support | The Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence”. Intelligence.house.gov. Archived from the original on August 13, 2014. Retrieved August 13, 2014.
  12. ^ “CISPA is Back: FAQ on What it is and Why it’s Still Dangerous | Electronic Frontier Foundation”. Eff.org. February 25, 2013. Retrieved August 13, 2014.
  13. ^ “FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 192” (XML). Clerk.house.gov. Retrieved February 27, 2017.
  14. ^ “H.R. 624: Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act”. April 22, 2013. Archived from the original on April 22, 2013.
  15. ^ Riley, Kim (October 23, 2017). “Alliance for Biosecurity hails Rep. Ruppersberger’s champion efforts around bioterrorism prevention”. Homeland Preparedness News. Retrieved October 25, 2017.
  16. ^ “Ruppersberger: ‘chemical and biological weapons can’t be tolerated anywhere. wmar2news.com. April 6, 2017.
  17. ^ “Maryland Congressman Expresses Concerns On Syria Withdrawal, Support For Trump Impeachment”. wbal.com. October 15, 2019.
  18. ^ “Dem Who Voted With GOP on Yemen War Met With Saudis”. The Young Turks. December 20, 2018.
  19. ^ “Maryland Democrats redraw the congressional district map”. The Washington Post. August 20, 2011. Retrieved August 22, 2011.
  20. ^ “Ruppersberger considering run for Governor”. The Baltimore Sun. April 10, 2013. Retrieved April 11, 2013.
  21. ^ “Congressman Ruppersberger Decides Against Run For Governor”. wbal.com. January 22, 2014. Retrieved February 22, 2017.
  22. ^ Staff (October 25, 2011). “Biography – Congressman Ruppersberger”. Dutch.house.gov. Archived from the original on November 3, 2011. Retrieved November 20, 2011.

External links

Political offices
Preceded by

Executive of Baltimore County
1994–2002
Succeeded by

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Maryland’s 2nd congressional district

2003–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
66th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

In 2015, Congressman Ruppersberger resumed his post on the powerful House Appropriations Committee, which is responsible for writing the laws that fund the federal government’s many responsibilities. Congressman Ruppersberger serves on the DefenseLegislative Branch and the Homeland Security subcommittees. The Appropriations Committee is responsible for allocating hundreds of billions of federal dollars each year.

These assignments are ideal match-ups for the Second District, which is home to Fort Meade, Aberdeen Proving Ground, NSA, the U.S. Cyber Command and many intelligence and defense agencies and contractors that employ hundreds of thousands of Marylanders. Congressman Ruppersberger considers his district the cybersecurity capital of the world.

On the Committee, Congressman Ruppersberger is focused on supporting services and investments critical to American families, defeating divisive ideological policy riders and preventing another government shutdown. In a difficult economy, Congressman Ruppersberger believes we have to do more with less, and thinks that job creation, rebuilding our nation’s infrastructure, education and keeping our nation safe and secure should be our top funding priorities.

Upon resuming his post on the committee, Congressman Ruppersberger said he believes that Appropriators, “share a tremendous responsibility to allocate precious tax dollars as efficiently as possible. This is a responsibility I take seriously.”

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

 

X
John SarbanesJohn Sarbanes- MD3

Current Position: US Representative for MD District 3 since 2007
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 US Senator
Former Position(s): Lawyer from 1988 – 2007

Featured Quote: 
This week, I’m joining my colleagues in passing federal spending bills that will create jobs, grow opportunity and provide a lifeline to working families. #ForThePeople

Featured Video: 
Grassroots Democracy: John Sarbanes at TEDxBaltimore

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Democracy Reform Task Force Chair Rep. John Sarbanes (D-Md.) today voted to pass H.R. 4, the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, a bill that would restore and protect voting rights across the country.

This historic legislation builds on the momentum of H.R. 1, the For the People Act – a once-in-a-generation transformational package of reforms to clean up corruption in Washington, expose secret foreign money in our politics, crack down on lobbyists, strengthen election security, return power back to the American people with citizen-owned elections and protect the right to vote. The Voting Rights Advancement Act fulfills the promise of H.R. 1’s findings section, which affirms Congress’ commitment to restore the Voting Rights Act, and honors the legacy of civil rights icon, Congressman John Lewis.

“The American people should not face obstacles to exercise their right to vote,” said Congressman Sarbanes, who authored H.R. 1. “After the Supreme Court’s misguided decisions in Shelby vs. Holder — and more recently Brnovich vs. DNC — voter suppression efforts have ramped up in states across the country. These harmful measures deny many Americans the sacred right to vote.”

“This historic bill honors the legacy of its namesake, the late Congressman John Lewis, who devoted his life to securing the sacred right to vote for every American – and all those who sacrificed for this noble cause,” Sarbanes continued. “I want to thank Representative Terri Sewell, Speaker Pelosi and Chairs Lofgren, Nadler and Butterfield for their leadership to advance strong voter protections. I am committed to continuing this fight and bolstering the voice of the people.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MD District 3 since 2007
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 US Senator
Former Position(s): Lawyer from 1988 – 2007

Featured Quote: 
This week, I’m joining my colleagues in passing federal spending bills that will create jobs, grow opportunity and provide a lifeline to working families. #ForThePeople

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Grassroots Democracy: John Sarbanes at TEDxBaltimore

News

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Democracy Reform Task Force Chair Rep. John Sarbanes (D-Md.) today voted to pass H.R. 4, the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, a bill that would restore and protect voting rights across the country.

This historic legislation builds on the momentum of H.R. 1, the For the People Act – a once-in-a-generation transformational package of reforms to clean up corruption in Washington, expose secret foreign money in our politics, crack down on lobbyists, strengthen election security, return power back to the American people with citizen-owned elections and protect the right to vote. The Voting Rights Advancement Act fulfills the promise of H.R. 1’s findings section, which affirms Congress’ commitment to restore the Voting Rights Act, and honors the legacy of civil rights icon, Congressman John Lewis.

“The American people should not face obstacles to exercise their right to vote,” said Congressman Sarbanes, who authored H.R. 1. “After the Supreme Court’s misguided decisions in Shelby vs. Holder — and more recently Brnovich vs. DNC — voter suppression efforts have ramped up in states across the country. These harmful measures deny many Americans the sacred right to vote.”

“This historic bill honors the legacy of its namesake, the late Congressman John Lewis, who devoted his life to securing the sacred right to vote for every American – and all those who sacrificed for this noble cause,” Sarbanes continued. “I want to thank Representative Terri Sewell, Speaker Pelosi and Chairs Lofgren, Nadler and Butterfield for their leadership to advance strong voter protections. I am committed to continuing this fight and bolstering the voice of the people.”

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About

John Sarbanes 2

Source: Government page

Congressman John Sarbanes has represented Maryland’s Third Congressional District in the U.S. Congress since 2007.

He currently serves on the House Committee on Energy and Commerce and the House Subcommittee on Environment and Climate Change. He serves as Vice Chair of the House Subcommittee on Health. Congressman Sarbanes also serves on the House Oversight and Reform Committee and its Subcommittee on Government Operations. He chairs the Democracy Reform Task Force, which has assembled HR1, the For The People Act, to reform and strengthen our democracy.

Born and raised in Baltimore, Congressman Sarbanes has experience working in the public, private and nonprofit sectors. He and his family live in Towson, giving him the opportunity to drive home every night and hear from the people he serves in Congress. Listening to their concerns allows him to better represent Maryland and has shaped his work in the House of Representatives.

Fighting for More-Affordable, Higher-Quality Health Care

Congressman Sarbanes is a strong supporter of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) because he believes it has reduced the cost of health care, improved our nation’s health care system and provided access for those who previously did not have insurance. He will continue to oppose any efforts to repeal the ACA unless a replacement is offered that maintains affordable coverage for the 20 million Americans who gained insurance under the law and that includes critical consumer protections – like the requirement that insurers cover those with pre-existing conditions and the ban on annual and lifetime coverage limits. While the ACA is not a perfect bill, it was a crucial step in the right direction – away from the influence of powerful special interests and toward commonsense solutions for American families. Additional healthcare priorities include a focus on prevention and primary care, ending racial disparities in health care and stemming the opioid epidemic.

Giving Students the Tools They Need to Succeed

Congressman Sarbanes has fought to expand higher education opportunities through financial assistance programs like the Pell Grant and has authored laws to help students repay their college loans after they graduate. In this effort, Congressman Sarbanes wrote a law to create the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Option, which provides graduates with forgiveness of remaining student loan debt after 10 years of work in public service or the non-profit sector. The new law helps teachers, nurses, first responders and other public servants pay for college. It allows more people to follow their dreams in careers that are important and rewarding, but not always particularly lucrative.

Life Before Congress

Before coming to Congress, Congressman Sarbanes served for seven years with the Maryland State Department of Education, working to make Maryland’s public school system one of the best in the nation. He practiced law for eighteen years, representing hospitals and senior living providers in their mission to deliver high-quality health care to the people of Maryland. Congressman Sarbanes also worked with public interest organizations in Maryland, like the Public Justice Center, where he championed efforts to protect consumers, provide decent public housing and ensure fair treatment in the workplace.

Congressman Sarbanes graduated from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and studied law and politics in Greece on a Fulbright Scholarship. After graduating from Harvard Law School, he returned to Baltimore, where he clerked for Judge J. Frederick Motz on the federal district court.

Since childhood, Congressman Sarbanes has attended the Greek Orthodox Cathedral of the Annunciation in Baltimore and he has also been active with his wife and children in the Bolton Street Synagogue.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

Democracy Reform Task Force

The Democracy Reform Task Force – chaired by Congressman John Sarbanes – is a bold effort in the U.S. House of Representatives to clean up Washington and put the public’s interests ahead of special interests.

The Democracy Reform Task Force:

  • Conducts Oversight of Ethical Violations – Brings together Congressional resources to ensure that government officials abide by our nation’s ethics laws and the U.S. Constitution.
  • Challenges Special-Interest Policy – Fights back against egregious special-interest giveaways that benefit wealthy donors, corporations and well-connected Washington insiders at the expense of everyday Americans.
  • Advances Positive Democracy Reforms – The 2020 election underscored the need for comprehensive, structural democracy reform. Americans across the country were forced to overcome rampant voter suppression, gerrymandering and a torrent of special-interest dark money just to exercise their vote and their voice in our democracy. It shouldn’t have to be this way. That’s why House Democrats are committed to advancing HR1, the For the People Act – a transformational anti-corruption and clean elections reform package – in the 117th Congress. We will clean up corruption in Washington, empower the American people and restore faith and integrity to our government. HR1 will get us there.

Our Republic’s strength is built on the American people’s trust in our institutions of democracy and it’s earned through fair elections, responsive governance and a robust system of checks and balances. The Democracy Reform Task Force works tirelessly to preserve and renew the public’s trust in our great Republic.

Learn more at https://democracyreform-sarbanes.house.gov.

Offices

Towson*

600 Baltimore Avenue, Suite 303
TowsonMD 21204

Phone: (410) 832-8890
Fax: (410) 832-8898
Hours: Monday – Friday
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Annapolis*

44 Calvert Street, Suite 349
AnnapolisMD 21401

Phone: (410) 295-1679
Fax: (410) 295-1682
Hours: Tuesday
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
(Or by Appointment)

Burtonsville*

14906 Old Columbia Pike
BurtonsvilleMD 20866

Phone: (301) 421-4078
Hours: Thursday
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
(Or by Appointment)

Washington, D.C.*

2370 Rayburn House Office Building
WashingtonDC 20515

Phone: (202) 225-4016
Fax: (202) 225-9219
Hours: Monday – Friday
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Twitter, YouTube, Government Page

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

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Voting Record

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Wikipedia Entry

John Peter Spyros Sarbanes (/ˈsɑːrˌbnz/ SARR-baynz; born May 22, 1962) is an American lawyer and politician who is the U.S. Representative for Maryland’s 3rd congressional district, serving since 2007. He is a member of the Democratic Party. The district includes the state capital of Annapolis, central portions of the city of Baltimore, and parts of Anne Arundel, Howard, Montgomery, and Baltimore counties.

Early life

John Sarbanes is the eldest son of former U.S. Senator Paul Sarbanes (who served as a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1971 to 1977 and as a United States Senator from 1977 to 2007) and Christine Dunbar Sarbanes, a teacher. He was born in Baltimore, having Greek origin on his father’s side and English on his mother’s,[1] and graduated from the Gilman School there in 1980.[2] He received a B.A., cum laude, from the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University in 1984, after completing a 194-page long senior thesis titled “The American Intelligence Community Abroad: Potential for a Breakdown Case Study, Greece, 1967”.[3] Sarbanes then received a J.D. from Harvard Law School, where he was co-chair of the Law School Democrats, in 1988.[2]

After college, Congressman Sarbanes served for seven years with the Maryland State Department of Education, working on Maryland’s public school system. He later clerked with Baltimore Judge J. Frederick Motz on the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland.[4] Sarbanes spent his professional legal career at the law firm of Venable LLP in Baltimore from 1989 to 2006, where he was chair of health care practice from 2000 to 2006 and a member of the hiring committee from 1992 to 1996.[2]

U.S. House of Representatives

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Environmental education

Congressman Sarbanes has introduced H.R. 2054, the No Child Left Inside Act (NCLI). This Act seeks to both improve education in the nation’s public schools and to protect the environment by “creating a new environmental education grant program, providing teacher training for environmental education, and including environmental education as an authorized activity under the Fund for the Improvement of Education.”[8] NCLI also requires states that participate in the environmental education grant programs to develop a plan to ensure that high school graduates are environmentally literate. This legislation is supported by a “coalition of over 1200 local, regional, and national organizations representing millions of concerned citizens who are anxious to see a new commitment to environmental education.”[8]

Government reforms

Following their victory in the 2018 midterm elections, Democrats in the House unveiled its first House bill for the 116th Congress. This bill, entitled the “For the People Act“, was primarily authored by Sarbanes. It passed the house in 2019, but died in the Republican controlled Senate. The bill was introduced again in the 117th Congress and passed the House.

The bill was a package of Democratic electoral goals and would enable small-dollar public funding of congressional elections, establish automatic national voter registration, expand early and online voter registration, and provide greater federal support for state voting systems. The bill proposed banning members of Congress from serving on corporate boards, and called for requiring political advocacy groups to disclose donors. It also required presidents to disclose their tax returns, and the establishment of a Supreme Court ethics code.[9] It also included a provision to decrease gerrymandering by creating independent commissions, this is despite the fact that Sarbanes’ district is one of the most gerrymandered districts in the United States.[10]

Campaigns

John Sarbanes at his swearing-in ceremony gesturing towards his father on the far left, former Senator Paul Sarbanes

Sarbanes sought the Democratic nomination for Maryland’s 3rd congressional district after 10-term incumbent Ben Cardin gave up the seat to run for the Senate seat of John Sarbanes’ father, Paul Sarbanes. The primary campaign included State Senator Paula Hollinger, former Baltimore City Health Commissioner Peter Beilenson, and former Maryland Democratic Party Treasurer Oz Bengur. Sarbanes won the nomination on September 12, 2006 with 31.9% of the vote. His Republican opponent in the general election was Annapolis marketing executive John White. However, the 3rd is a heavily Democratic district that has been in that party’s hands since 1927, and few expected Sarbanes to have much difficulty in the election. Sarbanes also benefited from name recognition; his father represented the district from 1971 to 1977. On November 7, 2006, Sarbanes won the general election with 64% of the vote, while White received 34% of the vote and Libertarian Charles Curtis McPeek received 2%. He has been reelected six times with no substantive opposition.

Personal life

Sarbanes lives in Towson, Maryland, with his three children and wife Dina Eve Caplan, whom he met at Harvard and married in 1988.[4][11]

References

  1. ^ “S. Doc. 109-34. Tributes Delivered in Congress to Paul S. Sarbanes”. www.gpo.gov. 207.
  2. ^ a b c “John P. Sarbanes, U.S. Representative”. Maryland State Archives. Archived from the original on 2009-04-13. Retrieved 2007-04-22.
  3. ^ Sarbanes, John Peter Spyros. Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs (ed.). “The American Intelligence Community Abroad: Potential for a Breakdown Case Study, Greece, 1967”. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  4. ^ a b “Biography of Congressman John Sarbanes”. Office of Congressman John Sarbanes. Archived from the original on 2007-04-12. Retrieved 2007-04-22.
  5. ^ “Our Members”. U.S. House of Representatives International Conservation Caucus. Archived from the original on 1 August 2018. Retrieved 5 August 2018.
  6. ^ “Membership”. Congressional Arts Caucus. Archived from the original on 20 January 2019. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  7. ^ “Members”. Congressional NextGen 9-1-1 Caucus. Retrieved 14 June 2018.
  8. ^ a b “John Sarbanes Official Biography”. Archived from the original on 2009-11-28. Retrieved 2009-12-03.
  9. ^ “House Democrats’ 1st bill aims for sweeping reforms”. AP NEWS. 2018-11-30. Retrieved 2018-12-02.
  10. ^ Meyers, David (7 November 2019). “The 12 worst House districts: Experts label gerrymandering’s dirty dozen”. The Fulcrum. Retrieved 1 June 2021.
  11. ^ “Dina Eve Caplan, Lawyer, to Marry”. The New York Times. August 21, 1988. Retrieved 2007-04-22.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Maryland’s 3rd congressional district

2007–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
100th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

House Energy and Commerce Committee

Congressman Sarbanes has been appointed to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce where he serves on the House Subcommittee on Environment and Climate Change and where he serves as Vice Chair of the House Subcommittee on Health.

Serving on the Energy and Commerce Committee gives Congressman Sarbanes the opportunity to be at the forefront of debate on some of the most important issues facing Americans today. Because of its broad jurisdiction, the Energy and Commerce Committee is considered an exclusive committee, which prevents members from serving on any other committees without special permission from the Democratic Caucus.

Jurisdiction of the House Energy and Commerce Committee includes:

  • Biomedical research and development;
  • Consumer affairs and consumer protection;
  • Health and health facilities (except health care supported by payroll deductions);
  • Interstate energy compacts;
  • Exploration, production, storage, supply, marketing, pricing and regulation of energy resources, including all fossil fuels, solar energy and other unconventional or renewable energy resources;
  • Conservation of energy resources;
  • Energy information;
  • The generation and marketing of power (except by federally chartered of federal regional power marketing authorities); reliability and interstate transmission of, and ratemaking for, all power; and siting of generation facilities (except the installation of interconnections between government waterpower projects);
  • General management of the Department of Energy and management of all functions of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission;
  • National energy policy generally;
  • Public health and quarantine;
  • Regulation of the domestic nuclear energy industry, including regulation of research and development reactors and nuclear regulatory research;
  • Regulation of interstate and foreign communications; and
  • Travel and tourism.

House Oversight and Reform Committee

Congressman Sarbanes also serves on the House Oversight and Reform Committee and its Subcommittee on Government Operations.

The Committee on Oversight and Reform is the main investigative committee in the U.S. House of Representatives. It has authority to investigate the subjects within the Committee’s legislative jurisdiction as well as “any matter” within the jurisdiction of the other standing House Committees.

Jurisdiction of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform includes:

  • Federal civil service, including intergovernmental personnel; and the status of officers and employees of the United States, including their compensation, classification, and retirement;
  • Municipal affairs of the District of Columbia in general (other than appropriations);
  • Federal paperwork reduction;
  • Government management and accounting measures generally;
  • Holidays and celebrations;
  • Overall economy, efficiency, and management of government operations and activities, including federal procurement;
  • National archives;
  • Population and demography generally, including the Census;
  • Postal service generally, including transportation of the mails;
  • Public information and records;
  • Relationship of the federal government to the states and municipalities generally; and
  • Reorganizations in the executive branch of the government.

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

HR1, the For the People Act

The 2020 election underscored the need for comprehensive, structural democracy reform. Americans across the country were forced to overcome rampant voter suppression, gerrymandering and a torrent of special-interest dark money just to exercise their vote and their voice in our democracy. It shouldn’t have to be this way. That’s why House Democrats are committed to advancing HR1, the For the People Act – a transformational anti-corruption and clean elections reform package – in the 117th Congress. We will clean up corruption in Washington, empower the American people and restore faith and integrity to our government. HR1 will get us there.

American Rescue Plan

The American Rescue Plan will help Marylanders prevail over the pandemic.

Drug-Free Communities

It’s an unfortunate fact that drug abuse and addiction are on the rise, but we must be committed to providing effective resources and treatments to those in need. Congressman Sarbanes is collaborating with state and other local leaders to identify opportunities for federal assistance to Maryland. Congressman Sarbanes is also working together with other concerned Members of Congress to strengthen available federal resources and support.

Education

Congressman Sarbanes is a national leader in the movement to promote environmental education, which he believes is critical to empowering and inspiring the next generation of scientists, teachers and environmental stewards.

Environment

Congressman Sarbanes shares the same passion for the environment as the people of Maryland’s Third Congressional District, who have a strong history of environmental advocacy for, and stewardship of, the Chesapeake Bay.

Federal Workforce

In this increasingly complex and fast-paced world, Americans deserve a government built for the 21st-century. That’s why making the federal government operate efficiently and effectively is a priority for Congressman Sarbanes. Congressman Sarbanes is committed to putting policies in place that improve government operation, help our nation’s dedicated federal workers succeed, and increase the efficacy of our civil-service.

Health Care

Congressman Sarbanes is a strong advocate for reforming our nation’s health care system. He has introduced and supported several bills that will expand affordable health coverage and improve the quality of care for all Americans.

Jobs & Economy

Congressman Sarbanes believes a strong economy means all Americans have the opportunity to succeed and make a better life for themselves and for their families. He supports policies that foster job creation, improve pay and benefits, build stronger communities and secure America’s role as a global economic leader.

Seniors

Congressman Sarbanes knows that our nation’s seniors make enormous contributions to our civic life and to the success and prosperity of our nation. That’s why he works to find ways to ensure that all seniors are treated with respect, that they receive the health care and retirement benefits they have earned and that they have meaningful opportunities to contribute to the workforce.

Veterans

America’s veterans have made every sacrifice to protect our country. Although we can never fully repay the debt we owe them, it is our duty as a nation to fulfill our commitments to them. Congressman Sarbanes has worked hard to ensure that veterans receive the compensation, health care, educational opportunities and employment assistance they deserve. He has fought to increase the veterans’ health budget and to pass a new GI Bill for the 21st century, increasing educational benefits so all our veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan can attend college and thrive in the civilian workforce.

X
Anthony G. BrownAnthony Brown – MD4

Current Position: US Representative for MD District 4 since 2017
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 US Senator
Former Position(s): Lt. Governor; State Delegate from 1999 – 2007

Featured Quote: 
USCP live in our communities in Maryland. They go into work day-in and day-out to protect our Capitol and Members of Congress, even those who put their lives in jeopardy Today, we heard their stories first hand. Their testimony should outrage and compel us to act

Featured Video: 
Democratic Weekly Address — Congressman Anthony Brown

 

The first U.S. stop for the nearly 2,000 Afghan interpreters and other refugees evacuated so far amid the collapse of the Afghan government has been central Virginia’s Fort Lee military base.

Tapped for its East Coast location and its ability to quickly ramp up to serve as a temporary host installation, the Army base just south of Richmond has been receiving Afghans eligible for Special Immigrant Visas since late last month.

Two other bases will soon be joining Fort Lee in processing the incoming Afghan evacuees. Department of Defense officials said Monday that they will also use Wisconsin’s Fort McCoy and Fort Bliss in Texas — which could allow for evacuating as many as 22,000 individuals to the U.S.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MD District 4 since 2017
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 US Senator
Former Position(s): Lt. Governor; State Delegate from 1999 – 2007

Featured Quote: 
USCP live in our communities in Maryland. They go into work day-in and day-out to protect our Capitol and Members of Congress, even those who put their lives in jeopardy Today, we heard their stories first hand. Their testimony should outrage and compel us to act

Featured Video: 
Democratic Weekly Address — Congressman Anthony Brown

 

News

The first U.S. stop for the nearly 2,000 Afghan interpreters and other refugees evacuated so far amid the collapse of the Afghan government has been central Virginia’s Fort Lee military base.

Tapped for its East Coast location and its ability to quickly ramp up to serve as a temporary host installation, the Army base just south of Richmond has been receiving Afghans eligible for Special Immigrant Visas since late last month.

Two other bases will soon be joining Fort Lee in processing the incoming Afghan evacuees. Department of Defense officials said Monday that they will also use Wisconsin’s Fort McCoy and Fort Bliss in Texas — which could allow for evacuating as many as 22,000 individuals to the U.S.

Twitter

About

Anthony Brown

Source: Government page

Anthony Brown was elected to his first term representing Maryland’s 4th Congressional District – encompassing parts of Anne Arundel and Prince George’s Counties – on November 8, 2016 and was sworn in on January 3, 2017. He is currently serving his third term in Congress.

The son of immigrants and raised in a home where his father was the first in the family to ever attend college, Congressman Brown was taught the value of service at a young age. Through his military and public service, Anthony has devoted his life to serving his community and defending our nation.

A retired Colonel in the United States Army Reserve, Congressman Brown’s military record spanned more than a quarter century as an aviator and JAG officer, during which time he graduated first in his flight class and received both Airborne and Air Assault qualifications. Congressman Brown was awarded the Legion of Merit for his distinguished military service. In 2004, he was deployed to Iraq, where he earned a Bronze Star and became one of the nation’s highest-ranking elected officials at that time to serve a tour of duty in that conflict.

In 1998, Congressman Brown was first elected to the Maryland House of Delegates to represent Prince George’s County. Recognized by his colleagues for his leadership, Congressman Brown rose quickly, serving as Vice Chair of the powerful House Judiciary Committee and, later, as Majority Whip.

Congressman Brown made an even larger impact on Maryland during his eight years as Lt. Governor. He fought to increase investments in Maryland schools so that every child could receive a world-class education, protected victims of domestic violence, expanded health coverage to over 391,000 Marylanders, increased employment and health services to veterans, and spearheaded efforts to plan for and coordinate the arrival of 60,000 BRAC-related jobs to Maryland, including at Joint Base Andrews and Fort Meade.

Congressman Brown is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School. He and his wife Karmen are members of St. Joseph Catholic Church in Largo. They reside in Prince George’s County where they are raising their three children, Rebecca, Jonathan, and Anthony.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

In the House of Representatives there are also a number of Caucuses (officially styled Congressional Member Organizations) – comprised of Members – to pursue common policy objectives.  Congressman Brown is a member of the following caucuses:

Task Forces

  1. New Democrat Coalition National Security Task Force.
  2. House Gun Violence Prevention Task Force
  3. House Speaker’s Task Force on Intergovernmental Affairs
  4. United for Climate and Environmental Justice

Congressman Brown is the Co-Chair of the New Democrat Coalition National Security Task Force

Offices

 

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

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Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

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Wikipedia Entry

Anthony Gregory Brown (born November 21, 1961) is an American lawyer and politician, who is serving as the U.S. Representative for Maryland’s 4th congressional district. The district covers most of the majority-black precincts in Prince George’s County, as well as a sliver of Anne Arundel County.

He previously served two terms as the eighth lieutenant governor of Maryland, from 2007 to 2015.[1][2] He was elected as lieutenant governor in 2006 on the Democratic ticket with Governor Martin O’Malley, and both were re-elected in 2010.[3] In 2014, Brown ran unsuccessfully for governor, losing to Republican nominee Larry Hogan.[4]

Brown served two four-year terms in the Maryland House of Delegates, representing Prince George’s County.

He is a retired Colonel in the United States Army Reserve, having served in the U.S. Army for over thirty years. While lieutenant governor, Brown was the highest-ranking elected official in the nation to have served a tour of duty in Iraq.[5][6]

In October 2021, Brown announced that he will not seek reelection to the House in 2022 because he will run for Maryland attorney general.[7]

Early life and education

Brown was born in 1961 in Huntington, New York, to immigrant parents. His father, Roy Hershel Brown, a physician, was born in Cayo Mambi, Cuba; was raised in Kingston, Jamaica; and later came to the U.S. to attend Fordham University.[8] Roy received his medical degree in Zurich, Switzerland, where he also met his future wife, Lilly I. Berlinger.[9] The couple married and Lilly moved with Brown to New York, where they had Anthony, his sister, and three brothers.[10]

The family lived in Huntington, New York, in Suffolk County on Long Island, where Anthony attended public schools, graduating from Huntington High School in 1979. In his senior year, Brown became the first African American to be elected president of Huntington High School’s student council.[11] After high school, Brown started at the United States Military Academy at West Point, where he had an appointment. He quickly switched to Harvard College, where he majored in Government and resided in Quincy House.[12] At Harvard, Brown served on the Student Advisory Committee at the Kennedy School of Government’s Institute of Politics. Since Harvard did not offer ROTC at the time, in his second year, Brown enrolled in the Army Reserve Officer Training Corps program at MIT and earned a two-year scholarship.[1] In 1984, Brown graduated with an A.B. cum laude, and as a Distinguished Military Graduate.

Military career

Upon graduation, Brown received a commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army. He served on active duty for five years. He graduated first in his flight class at Fort Rucker, Alabama. During his time on active duty, Brown served as a helicopter pilot with the Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division in Europe.[13] During that period of active duty, Brown held positions as platoon leader for a target acquisition, reconnaissance and surveillance platoon, executive officer of a general support aviation company, a battalion logistics officer, and the flight operations officer for Task Force 23.[citation needed]

Law school and legal career

After completing his active duty service, Brown returned to graduate school, entering Harvard Law School in 1989 and earning his JD degree. He attended Harvard Law School at the same time as future President Barack Obama, Artur Davis and actor Hill Harper. Brown was a member of the Board of Student Advisers. His third-year paper, written under the supervision of Professor Charles Ogletree, analyzed the scope of the Fourth Amendment‘s protections against unreasonable search and seizure in the military. Brown was Chair of the Membership Committee of the Black Law Students Association.[citation needed] Brown graduated from Harvard Law, with a Juris Doctor in 1992.

After graduating from law school, Brown completed a two-year clerkship for Chief Judge Eugene Sullivan of the United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces. In 1994, he joined the Washington, D.C. office of the international law firm of Wilmer Cutler Pickering (now WilmerHale). Brown practiced law with the late John Payton,[14] a renowned civil rights attorney and former president of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, and Stephen H. Sachs, who was the United States Attorney for the District of Maryland from 1967 to 1970 and was the 40th Attorney General of Maryland. In 1998, Brown received Wilmer’s Pro Bono Publico Award for his work in representing indigent clients. In 1999, Brown worked for Merrill Lynch for five months.[15] Brown joined the Prince George’s County land use and zoning law firm Gibbs & Haller in 2000, after having been elected to the Maryland General Assembly.[citation needed]

JAG Corps

Colonel Brown’s official U.S. Army photo, 2011

Brown continued his military service as a Judge Advocate General (JAG) in the United States Army Reserve. Brown began his service as a JAG with attending The JAG School at the University of Virginia and then the 10th LSO in Upper Marlboro, Maryland, where he held numerous assignments, including in the areas of international law and claims law.[citation needed] Brown ultimately attained the rank of colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve before reaching the point of mandatory retirement in July 2014.[16]

His assignments included Commander of the 153rd Legal Support Organization in Norristown, Pennsylvania, where, in addition to supporting deploying service members and their families with legal services, he mobilized eighteen soldiers to Fort Hood, Texas in support of the III Corps’ Operation New Dawn mission to Iraq. Prior to his tenure with the 153rd LSO, Brown was the Staff Judge Advocate for the 353rd Civil Affairs Command headquartered at Fort Wadsworth, New York.

In 2004, Brown, then a member of the Maryland House of Delegates, was deployed to Iraq as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Brown served in Baghdad, Fallujah, Kirkuk, and Basra with the 353rd Civil Affairs Command as Senior Consultant to the Iraqi Ministry of Displacement and Migration. Brown received the Bronze Star for his distinguished service in Iraq.

Maryland House of Delegates

Brown’s political career began in 1998, when he was elected to serve in the Maryland House of Delegates, representing the 25th district in Prince George’s County. Brown ran on a Democratic Party ticket with Senator Ulysses Currie, Delegate Dereck Davis, and Delegate Melony Griffith. He served two terms in the Maryland House of Delegates and rose to several positions of leadership. During his first term, Brown served on the House Economic Matters Committee. He was appointed Vice Chair of the Judiciary Committee in 2003. In 2004, Speaker of the House Michael E. Busch appointed Brown to the position of Majority Whip, the fourth-ranking position in the House.

Lieutenant Governor of Maryland

Brown’s Lt. Governor portrait

In 2006, Brown was elected Lieutenant Governor on a ticket with Martin O’Malley, the former Mayor of Baltimore.[17] The pair were the only challenging candidates to defeat an incumbent gubernatorial ticket in the 2006 election cycle.[18] On January 17, 2007, Brown was sworn in as Maryland’s 8th lieutenant governor. Both Brown and O’Malley were reelected by a 56% to 42% margin on November 2, 2010. Brown was the first person ever elected Lieutenant Governor directly from the Maryland House of Delegates.

Governor O’Malley tasked Brown to lead the O’Malley-Brown Administration’s efforts on several policy fronts, including efforts to expand and improve health care, support economic development, help victims of domestic violence, increase access to higher education, and provide Veterans with better services and resources.

In July 2010, Brown was elected chair of the National Lieutenant Governors Association,[19] a position he served in for a term of one year.[20]

Health care

As Co-Chair of the Maryland Health Care Reform Coordinating Council and Maryland’s Health Quality and Cost Council, Lt. Governor Brown led the O’Malley-Brown administration’s efforts to reduce costs, expand access, and improve the quality of care for all residents of the state. In June 2012, Brown was named “Maryland’s Public Health Hero” by the Maryland Health Care for All! Coalition.[21] He assisted in the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, which according to a “non-partisan” 2012 study using Obama administration numbers and various state agency projections, would save Maryland $672 million by 2020.[22][23] In both 2011 and 2012, Brown led legislation through the Maryland General Assembly to create a health insurance exchange.[24]

Brown was severely criticized for his leadership of the development of the health insurance exchange.[25] As of April 14, 2014, it had enrolled only 66,203 individuals (including family members on shared plans).[26] The O’Malley Administration apologized for the “botched” launch of the Web site and had to seek emergency funding legislation to make stopgap changes to the site.[27] The state paid a contractor $125.5 million to develop and operate the failed site.[28] Due to the failed rollout, the state incurred an estimated $30.5 million in unnecessary Medicaid spending.[29] The web site failure was the subject of a federal investigation into the costs associated with developing the exchange and the site’s performance failures.[30] The state announced that it was considering scrapping its failed online health exchange altogether and hiring a new contractor to build a new online exchange using technology employed by the state of Connecticut, at an expected cost of tens of millions of dollars.[28] The Obama administration relaxed rules for residents of states like Maryland with dysfunctional online health care exchanges, allowing consumers to bypass the exchanges altogether to buy health insurance.[31]

Brown led efforts to address health disparities among racial and ethnic groups in Maryland. In 2012, he developed created Health Enterprise Zones,[32] which would use incentives to increase the number of primary care providers and other essential health care services in underserved communities. The goal is to reduce preventable diseases, such as asthma and diabetes.[33]

Economic development

Brown led the administration’s economic development portfolio. He served as chair of numerous economic development initiatives, including the Joint Legislative and Executive Commission on Oversight of Public-Private Partnerships, the Governor’s Subcabinet on Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC), and the FastTrack initiative – part of Maryland Made Easy (www.easy.maryland.gov) – to streamline the state permitting process for businesses and developers.[34]

Public-private partnerships

Lt. Governor Anthony Brown testifies for Public-Private Partnership Legislation

Brown became one of the leading champions for the increased use of public-private partnerships to advance infrastructure projects in Maryland. Governor Martin O’Malley appointed Brown to serve as Chair of the Joint Legislative and Executive Commission on Oversight of Public-Private Partnerships. The fifteen-member Commission was established in 2010 under House Bill 1370 to evaluate the State’s framework and oversight of public–private partnerships. Under Brown’s leadership, the Commission worked to increase the potential for private investment in public infrastructure projects. The commission submitted its final report to the Governor and General Assembly in January 2012, which included assessing the oversight, best practices, and approval processes for public-private partnerships in other states; evaluating the definition of public-private partnerships; making recommendations concerning the appropriate manner of conducting legislative monitoring and oversight of public-private partnerships; and making recommendations concerning broad policy parameters within which public-private partnerships should be negotiated.[35]

Base realignment and closure (BRAC)

Brown was tasked by Governor O’Malley to lead the Base Realignment and Closure Subcabinet and the implementation of Maryland’s BRAC Plan, which ensured the State of Maryland would be ready for the 28,000 households that came to the state as a result of the BRAC process. It was estimated that between and 45,000 to 60,000 jobs would be created in Maryland by 2016 due to BRAC.[36] Since 2007, the BRAC Subcabinet met regularly with BRAC stakeholders to coordinate and synchronize the State’s efforts with public and private partners to address BRAC needs. The BRAC Plan set forth new initiatives and priorities to address the human capital and physical infrastructure requirements to support BRAC, as well as to seize the opportunities that BRAC presents, while preserving the quality of life already enjoyed by Marylanders. Several of the larger moves included the Army’s Communications–Electronics Command (CECOM) to Aberdeen Proving Ground from Ft. Monmouth, New Jersey, and the Air National Guard Readiness Center at Joint Base Andrews Naval Air Facility Washington. The Defense Information Systems Agency was relocating to Fort George G. Meade from northern Virginia and Walter Reed Army Medical Center was moving to the Bethesda Naval Hospital to create the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center at Bethesda.

In 2011, the Association of Defense Communities recognized Brown as their Public Official of the Year for his leadership on BRAC.[37]

Domestic violence

In August 2008, his cousin Cathy was murdered by her estranged boyfriend.[38] Building on his legislative experience and personal perspective, Brown has championed reforms to fight domestic violence and provide improved support to victims.

In 2009, Brown led efforts to improve domestic violence laws and take guns out of the hands of domestic abusers by allowing judges to order the abuser in a temporary protective order to surrender any firearms in their possession.[39]

During the 2010 Legislative Session, Brown worked with the General Assembly to pass legislation allowing a victim of domestic abuse to terminate a residential lease with a copy of a final protective order.[40] During the 2012 Legislative Session, Brown gained the administration’s goal of extending unemployment benefits to a victim of domestic violence who decides to leave employment because the abuser is a threat at the workplace.

Brown also led efforts to expand the availability of hospital-based Domestic Violence Screening programs at Maryland hospitals to help identify victims of domestic violence and connect them to support services. In 2010, he helped launch Maryland’s fifth hospital-based domestic violence program at Prince George’s Hospital Center in Cheverly. In 2011, Brown helped launch a sixth hospital-based program at Meritus Medical Center in Hagerstown, Maryland. Similar programs are in place in the Baltimore region at Anne Arundel Medical Center, Mercy Medical Center, Sinai Hospital, and Northwest Hospital.[41]

Education

Under the O’Malley Brown Administration, Maryland’s students made dramatic improvements in nearly every statistical category,[citation needed] and Maryland’s schools were ranked # 1 in the country for 4 years in a row.[42]

Brown lead the O’Malley-Brown administration’s efforts to increase taxes to support education and other programs. They raised taxes over 40 times during their tenure. The administration took steps to make a higher education more accessible and affordable for all Marylanders, including making record investments in community colleges and working to keep an education affordable at four-year public colleges and universities. As a result, the number of STEM college graduates, number of associate degrees, and the number of bachelor’s degrees awarded in Maryland all increased since the team took office in 2007.[42]

In 2010, Lt. Governor Brown launched the Skills2Compete initiative, which promotes programs and activities that lead to increasing the skill level of Marylanders though the attainment of a post-secondary credential, apprenticeship program or degree.[43]

Veterans affairs

Lt. Governor Brown announcing the launch of ‘Maryland’s Commitment to Veterans’ tour, September 2008

Brown was the nation’s highest-ranking elected official to have served a tour of military duty in Iraq[5][6] and he led the O’Malley-Brown Administration’s work to improve benefits and services for Maryland’s veterans.[citation needed]

In 2012, Brown announced the launch of Maryland Homefront: the Veterans and Military Family Mortgage Program, which helps qualified current and former military members find homes by giving them a discounted mortgage interest rate and help with closing costs.[citation needed] Also in 2012, Brown helped pass legislation that allows notation of ‘veteran’ status on drivers’ licenses and identification card.[citation needed]

During the 2008 session of the Maryland General Assembly, Brown led the administration’s successful efforts to pass a sweeping veterans package, including passage of the Veterans Behavioral Health Act of 2008. The legislation sets aside $2.3 million for the expansion of direct services to OIF/OEF veterans living with behavioral and mental health problem. The legislation also named Brown chair of the Maryland Veterans Behavioral Health Advisory Board.[44][45]

Other legislation passed as part of the ‘Maryland’s Commitment to Veterans’ package includes:

  • Expansion of state scholarship fund for OIF/OEF veterans and their dependents;
  • Protection of State-funded business loan program for veterans and service-disable veterans;
  • Creation of reintegration program for members of the Maryland National Guard returning from service in Iraq and Afghanistan; and
  • Expansion of State veteran service centers in rural communities.

2008 election and Obama transition

Despite being a classmate of Barack Obama, in September 2007, Brown initially endorsed Hillary Clinton for President in the 2008 election.[46][47] He campaigned for her in several states, including South Carolina and Georgia.[48] In June 2008, Brown subsequently endorsed Obama.

In July 2008, Brown was appointed to the Democratic National Committee‘s Platform Committee and served on the Platform Drafting Committee. Brown led the efforts to strengthen the Democratic Party‘s commitment to veterans and ensuring that the Chesapeake Bay be named as a “national treasure.”[49] Brown was a ‘Party Leader/Elected Official’ delegate to the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado in late August 2008 and cast his vote for then-Senator Obama, along with 98 members of the Maryland delegation.[50]

Brown was named Co-Chair of the Obama/Biden Presidential Transition Agency Review Team for the Department of Veterans Affairs on November 14, 2008.[51]

2014 gubernatorial candidacy

Anthony Brown announced his candidacy for Governor of Maryland in the 2014 election on May 10, 2013, at Prince George’s County Community College. He chose Ken Ulman, county executive of Howard County, Maryland, as his running mate in June 2013.[52] Brown was endorsed by Governor Martin O’Malley, U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski, U.S. Congressman Steny Hoyer, Maryland Senate President Thomas V. Miller, Jr., and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. Brown faced Attorney General Doug Gansler and Delegate Heather Mizeur in the Democratic primary.[53] Brown won the June 2014 Democratic primary[54] and became the Democratic nominee for governor but was defeated by Republican nominee Larry Hogan in the general election on November 4, 2014.

Maryland gubernatorial election, 2014
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanLarry Hogan847,28051.45%+9.66%
DemocraticAnthony Brown771,24246.83%-9.41%
LibertarianShawn Quinn23,8131.44%+0.68%
Write-ins4,2650.25%
Turnout1,655,37545%[55]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2016

On March 12, 2015, The Baltimore Sun reported that Brown would run for the U.S. House of Representatives seat for Maryland’s 4th district, which was being vacated by Donna Edwards, who was running for the US Senate.[56] He won a crowded six-way Democratic primary—the real contest in this heavily Democratic, black-majority district—with 41 percent of the vote.[57]

Brown won the seat in the general election, taking over 73 percent of the vote.[58]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Personal life

Lieutenant Governor Brown and Karmen Walker Brown in May 2011

Brown married Patricia Arzuaga in 1993, and they had two children, Rebecca and Jonathan, before their divorce in 2009.[64] Jonathan was adopted.[65]

Brown married Karmen Walker on May 27, 2012. She is the widow of Prince George’s County police officer Anthony Michael Walker. He became the stepfather of Walker’s son Anthony.[64][66][67] Both Anthony and Brown’s son Jonathan are in the same grade at the same Catholic school.[67] Walker is a director of government relations with Comcast.[64][68] Brown is Catholic.[69]

Awards, ribbons, and badges

Brown’s personal awards include:[1]

Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster

Bronze oak leaf cluster

Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster

Bronze star

Armed Forces Reserve Medal with mobilization device.png
Award numeral 2.png
1st rowLegion of MeritBronze Star Medal
2nd rowMeritorious Service MedalArmy Commendation Medal with two oak leaf clustersArmy Achievement Medal with one oak leaf cluster
3rd rowArmy Reserve Components Achievement Medal with four oak leaf clustersNational Defense Service Medal with bronze service starIraq Campaign Medal
4th rowGlobal War on Terrorism Service MedalOutstanding Volunteer Service MedalArmed Forces Reserve Medal with Hourglass (not shown) and “M” devices
5th rowArmy Service RibbonArmy Overseas Service RibbonArmy Reserve Overseas Training Ribbon with award numeral 2

Brown was also awarded the Army Aviator Badge, and the Army Superior Unit Award. He is Airborne and Air Assault qualified, and is authorized to wear one Overseas Service Bar.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d Anthony G. Brown, Lt. Governor“. Political biography. Maryland State Archives. Retrieved February 14, 2007.
  2. ^ O’Malley/Brown in Maryland gubernatorial race[permanent dead link]“. The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved January 10, 2007. Not available online as of January 13, 2007.
  3. ^ “Maryland election results 2010: Martin O’Malley beats Bob Ehrlich in a rematch for Governor”. The Washington Post. November 2, 2010.
  4. ^ “Republican Larry Hogan wins Md. governor’s race in stunning upset”. washingtonpost.com. Retrieved November 5, 2014.
  5. ^ a b Shoop, Tom (November 21, 2008). “Maryland Lt. Gov. ‘Serious’ Contender for VA Slot”. National Journal. Archived from the original on January 12, 2011. Retrieved December 31, 2008. having spent 10 months in the country in 2004
  6. ^ a b Bush, Matt (May 23, 2012). “Fundraising Website Launched By Maryland Lt. Gov. Brown”. wamu.org. American University. Retrieved August 18, 2012.
  7. ^ Wilson, Reid (October 25, 2021). “Rep. Brown to run for Maryland attorney general”. Retrieved October 25, 2021.
  8. ^ “Roy Hershel Brown Obituary”. The New York Times. February 3, 2014. Retrieved March 12, 2015 – via Legacy.com.
  9. ^ Montgomery, David (October 28, 2006). “A Demanding Race”. The Washington Post. p. C1. Retrieved October 13, 2012.
  10. ^ “One to watch: Maryland’s Lt. Governor Anthony Brown”. National Public Radio. Retrieved April 12, 2008.
  11. ^ Cox, Erin. “Brown on a deliberate march toward goal years in the making”. baltimoresun.com. Baltimore Sun. Retrieved December 28, 2019.
  12. ^ “Md. Lawmaker Trades Politics For New Fight (washingtonpost.com)”. Wp-dr.wpni.com. Archived from the original on January 14, 2016. Retrieved May 11, 2012.
  13. ^ This is the official formatting of the brigade and division names, per“Lineage And Honors Information”. United States Army Center of Military History. Retrieved April 22, 2014.
  14. ^ “Obama pays tribute to NAACP’s John Payton”. Politico.Com. March 19, 2012. Retrieved March 23, 2012.
  15. ^ Wagner, John (April 21, 2014). “Brown updates state biography to include work with wealth-management firm in 1999”. The Washington Post. Retrieved May 14, 2014.
  16. ^ Wagner, John (May 17, 2014). “For Maryland Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown’s campaign, service has become central”. The Washington Post. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  17. ^ Cook, Dave. “O’Malley Picks Anthony Brown as Running Mate Archived December 14, 2006, at the Wayback Machine“. Baltimore Times. December 16, 2005. from Martin O’Malley political website. Retrieved February 14, 2007.
  18. ^ “Martin O’Malley News and Photos”. baltimoresun.com. The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved December 4, 2008.
  19. ^ “2010–2011 Officers & Executive Committee”. nlga.us. National Lieutenant Governors Association. Archived from the original on July 22, 2011. Retrieved May 24, 2011.
  20. ^ “Lt. Governor Anthony Brown Completes Term as Chair of National Lieutenant Governors Association”. Archived from the original on October 1, 2011. Retrieved November 8, 2011.
  21. ^ “Lt. Governor Brown Receives Public Health Hero Award” (Press release). Office of Lt. Governor Anthony Brown. June 7, 2012. Archived from the original on June 26, 2012. Retrieved June 4, 2013.
  22. ^ “Maryland Health Care Reform Simulation Model: Detailed Analysis and Methodology” (PDF). The Hilltop Institute. July 2012. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 17, 2013. Retrieved June 4, 2013.
  23. ^ “Health Care Reform Simulation Model Projections” (PDF). The Hilltop Institute. July 13, 2012. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 17, 2013. Retrieved June 4, 2013.
  24. ^ Press Release. “O’Malley-Brown Administration’s Health Care Reform Package Signed Into Law Archived October 1, 2011, at the Wayback Machine“. Office of Lt. Governor. April 12, 2011. From Lt. Governor Brown’s official website. Retrieved October 16, 2011.
  25. ^ McCartney, Robert (December 11, 2013). “Brown bungles health-care plan debut but will probably win Md. governorship anyway”. The Washington Post. Retrieved March 10, 2014.
  26. ^ “Md. spent $90 million on health exchange technology, according to cost breakdown”. The Washington Post. April 14, 2014. Retrieved April 18, 2014.
  27. ^ WBALTV11 (January 15, 2014). “O’Malley administration apologizes for botched health exchange rollout”. Retrieved March 10, 2014.
  28. ^ a b Johnson, Jenna; Flaherty, Mary Pat (March 30, 2014). “Maryland gears up for health exchange redo”. The Washington Post. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  29. ^ Johnson, Jenna; Flaherty, Mary Pat (February 27, 2014), “Maryland begins to put a price on health-care exchange debacle”, The Washington Post, retrieved March 10, 2014
  30. ^ Gantz, Sarah (March 10, 2014). “Feds to investigate Maryland’s health exchange”. Baltimore Business Journal. Retrieved March 10, 2014.
  31. ^ “Obamacare rule eased for states with website troubles”. CBS News. Associated Press. February 28, 2014. Retrieved March 18, 2014.
  32. ^ “Senate Bill 234”. Maryland General Assembly. 2012. Retrieved June 4, 2013.
  33. ^ “What is a HEZ?”. Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Retrieved June 4, 2013.
  34. ^ Press Release. “Lt. Governor Brown Testifies Before General Assembly on Job Creation Through Infrastructure Projects Archived November 1, 2011, at the Wayback Machine“. Office of Lt. Governor. October 18, 2011. From Lt. Governor Brown’s official website. Retrieved on November 6, 2011.
  35. ^ Press Release. “Lt. Governor Brown Presides Over Joint Legislative and Executive Commission on Oversight of Public-Private Partnerships Archived October 1, 2011, at the Wayback Machine“. Office of Lt. Governor. August 31, 2011. From Lt. Governor Brown’s official website. Retrieved on November 6, 2011.
  36. ^ “Base Realignment and Closure Study Assesses Impact on Maryland Resources” (Press release). Office of the Lt. Governor. February 9, 2007. Archived from the original on December 19, 2008. Retrieved November 22, 2008.
  37. ^ “Maryland’s Lieutenant Governor Earns Defense Community Award” (Press release). Association of Defense Communities. July 7, 2011. Archived from the original on July 29, 2012. Retrieved November 6, 2011.
  38. ^ News Article. “Maryland Receives $2M Grant To Stop Domestic Violence“. WAMU 88.5 American University Radio. October 31, 2011. Retrieved on November 6, 2011.
  39. ^ Press Release. “Statement from Lt. Governor Anthony G. Brown on Passage of HB 296 and HB 302 Archived October 1, 2011, at the Wayback Machine“. Office of Lt. Governor. March 17, 2009. From Lt. Governor Brown’s official website. Retrieved on November 6, 2011.
  40. ^ Press Release. “Lt. Governor Brown Applauds Delegate Glenn, General Assembly for Passing Strong Legislation to Protect Victims of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Archived December 1, 2011, at the Wayback Machine“. Office of Lt. Governor. April 9, 2010. From Lt. Governor Brown’s official website. Retrieved on November 6, 2011.
  41. ^ Press Release. “Lt. Governor Brown Announces New Hospital-Based Domestic Violence Program at Prince George’s Hospital Center Archived December 1, 2011, at the Wayback Machine“. Office of Lt. Governor. October 20, 2010. From Lt. Governor Brown’s official website. Retrieved on November 6, 2011.
  42. ^ a b “Governor O’Malley’s 15 Strategic Policy Goals: 2. Improve Student Achievement and School, College, and Career Readiness in Maryland by 25% by End 2015”. Office of Governor Martin O’Malley. January 12, 2012. Archived from the original on February 1, 2013. Retrieved December 15, 2015.
  43. ^ Press Release. “Lt. Governor Brown Tours New Dorchester Career & Technology Center Archived December 1, 2011, at the Wayback Machine“. Office of Lt. Governor. June 29, 2011. From Lt. Governor Brown’s official website. Retrieved on November 6, 2011.
  44. ^ Bowman, Joshua (September 24, 2008). “Md.’s lieutenant governor promotes veterans program during Boonsboro visit”. Hagerstown Harold-Mail. Retrieved November 28, 2008.
  45. ^ “Lt. Governor Anthony Brown and the Maryland Higher Education Commission Launch New Veterans of Afghanistan and Iraq Conflicts Scholarship Program”. Office of the Lt. Governor. Archived from the original on July 21, 2011. Retrieved November 28, 2008.
  46. ^ “Hillary Clinton: Press Release – Maryland Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown Endorses Clinton”. Presidency.ucsb.edu. September 25, 2007. Retrieved May 11, 2012.
  47. ^ “Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, Maryland, Former Obama Classmate, Endorses Clinton – Democratic Underground”. Upload.democraticunderground.com. September 24, 2007. Retrieved May 11, 2012.
  48. ^ “O’Malley’s Clinton ties get politically thorny”. The Baltimore Sun. February 8, 2008. Retrieved May 11, 2012.
  49. ^ “Lt. Governor Anthony G. Brown Named to Democratic National Committee Platform Drafting Committee”. Office of the Lt. Governor of Maryland. July 8, 2008. Archived from the original on May 1, 2009. Retrieved November 27, 2008.
  50. ^ “POLITICAL PARTIES”. Maryland State Archives. Retrieved November 27, 2008.
  51. ^ Dechter, Gadi (November 18, 2008). “Lt. Gov. Brown a co-chair of Obama veterans team”. The Baltimore Sun. Archived from the original on July 30, 2012. Retrieved November 28, 2008.
  52. ^ Cox, Erin (June 3, 2013). “Brown names Ulman as his running mate”. The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved June 4, 2013.
  53. ^ Wagner, John (September 17, 2013). “Brown plans to announce Mikulski’s endorsement at campaign event Sunday”. The Washington Post. Retrieved September 19, 2013.
  54. ^ Shepard, Steven (June 24, 2014). “Democrat Anthony Brown wins Maryland governor primary”. Politico. Retrieved June 25, 2014.
  55. ^ Sandoval, Timothy (November 5, 2014). “Low Democratic turnout propelled Larry Hogan to victory in Maryland governor’s race”. Baltimore Business Journal. Retrieved March 12, 2015.
  56. ^ Fritze, John (March 12, 2015). “Anthony Brown to run for House seat”. The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved March 12, 2015.
  57. ^ “Official 2016 Primary Election Results”. Maryland Secretary of State. Retrieved April 28, 2016.
  58. ^ “Unofficial 2016 Presidential General Election results for Representative in Congress – District 4”. Retrieved November 9, 2016.
  59. ^ “Membership”. Congressional Black Caucus. Retrieved March 7, 2018.
  60. ^ “Members”. New Democrat Coalition. Archived from the original on February 8, 2018. Retrieved February 6, 2018.
  61. ^ “Committees and Caucuses”. Anthony Brown. Retrieved July 4, 2020.
  62. ^ “Members”. Congressional NextGen 9-1-1 Caucus. Retrieved June 11, 2018.
  63. ^ “Members”. U.S. – Japan Caucus. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  64. ^ a b c “Md. Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown Announces Engagement”. CBS Baltimore. Associated Press. May 16, 2011. Retrieved February 10, 2012.
  65. ^ Brown, Anthony G. (November 26, 2012). “Anthony Brown: My Son Jonathan”. Glen Burnie Patch. Archived from the original on January 31, 2013. Retrieved December 16, 2012.
  66. ^ “Maryland Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown marries Karmen Bailey Walker in College Park”. The Washington Post. May 30, 2012. Retrieved May 30, 2012.
  67. ^ a b “A ‘little hug thing’ blossoms in Md”. The Washington Post. May 30, 2012. Archived from the original on March 29, 2015. Retrieved September 2, 2012. Walker’s son Anthony, 12, is a few months older than Brown’s son Jonathan, and the two are in the same grade at the same Catholic school.
  68. ^ “Maryland Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown is engaged”. The Washington Post. May 16, 2011. Retrieved February 11, 2012.
  69. ^ Murphy, Caryle (March 24, 2006). “Cardinals Scramble To Defeat Abuse Bills; Child Victims Would Get More Time to Sue in Md”. The Washington Post. via HighBeam Research (subscription required). Archived from the original on March 29, 2015. Retrieved January 25, 2013. Committee member Anthony G. Brown (D-Prince George’s), who is Catholic…

External links

Political offices
Preceded by

Lieutenant Governor of Maryland
2007–2015
Succeeded by

Party political offices
Preceded by

Democratic nominee for Governor of Maryland
2014
Succeeded by

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Maryland’s 4th congressional district

2017–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
252nd
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

The House of Representatives has 20 standing committees which have jurisdiction over specific issue areas. These committees play an important role in the legislative process, hold hearings and oversee agencies and programs within their purview.

Congressman Brown has been appointed to the follow committees for the 116th Congress:

House Armed Services Committee

The Armed Services Committee is responsible for policy related to defense policy generally; ongoing military operations; the organization and reform of the Department of Defense and national security functions of the Department of Energy; and consideration of the annual defense authorization and budget that involves millions of military and civilian personnel, thousands of facilities, and hundreds of agencies, departments and commands throughout the world.

Subcommittee Assignments:

Seapower and Projection Forces
Tactical Air & Land Forces

House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure

The  House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure has jurisdiction over all modes of transportation: aviation, maritime and waterborne transportation, highways, bridges, mass transit, and railroads.  The Committee also has jurisdiction over other aspects of our national infrastructure, such as clean water and waste water management, the transport of resources by pipeline, flood damage reduction, the management of federally owned real estate and public buildings, the development of economically depressed rural and urban areas, disaster preparedness and response, and hazardous materials transportation.

In addition, the Transportation Committee has broad jurisdiction over the Department of Transportation, ,the U.S. Coast Guard, Amtrak, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Economic Development Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and others. The Committee also has jurisdiction over federal buildings, which includes the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

Subcommittee Assignments:

Highways and Transit
Aviation
Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation

House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs

The House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs has jurisdiction over veterans’ measures generally, including veterans’ hospitals, medical care, treatment compensation, vocational rehabilitation, and education, as well as over pensions of all the wars of the United States (general and special), the readjustment of servicemembers to civil life, and servicemembers’ civil relief. To ensure veterans receive these crucial services and benefits, the Committee is committed to its oversight role of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs, including the Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA), the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), and the National Cemetery Administration (NCA). The Committee also oversees life insurance issued by the Government on account of service in the Armed Forces as well as the cemeteries of the United States in which veterans of any war or conflict are or may be buried (whether in the United States or abroad, except cemeteries administered by the Secretary of the Interior).

Subcommittee Assignments:

Economic Opportunity
Technology Modernization

Legislation

You can also learn more about legislation sponsored and co-sponsored by Congressman Brown. You can also view Congressman Brown’s vote record here.

Issues

 

X
Steny HoyerSteny Hoyer – MD5

Current Position: US Representative for MD District 5 since 1981
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 US Senator
Former Position(s): State Senator from 1967 – 1978

Other Positions:  
House Majority Leader

Featured Quote: 
In the first 200 days of the 117th Congress, House Democrats have delivered results for Americans. Take a look at the significant legislative accomplishments that House Democrats have advanced during this Congress #ForThePeople:

Featured Video: 
Steny Hoyer Promotes ‘Help America Vote Act’ In Appropriations Bill

Source: Campaign page

WASHINGTON, DC – Today, Congressman Steny H. Hoyer, Senators Chris Van Hollen (MD)  and Senator Ben Cardin (MD), and Representatives Dutch Ruppersberger (MD-02), John Sarbanes (MD-03), Andy Harris (MD-01), Kweisi Mfume (MD-07), Anthony Brown (MD-04), Jamie Raskin (MD-08), and David Trone (MD-06) sent a letter to the Maryland Department of Labor (MDOL) pressing for answers regarding their delivery of unemployment benefits to Marylanders impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and urging the agency to expedite distribution of these crucial benefits. In their letter, the members stress the importance of a timely delivery of these benefits and request MDOL to provide data on the current status of benefits, including how many Marylanders have received payments, the amount of payments disbursed, the number of claims that are currently pending, and average turnaround time for adjudicating claims.

The members begin, “When the COVID-19 pandemic began in the United States, Congress acted quickly to provide expanded unemployment benefits to workers and administrative funding to states charged with processing UI claims and implementing these new assistance programs. However, many of our constituents dealt with delays and were unable to access their benefits. Almost a year and half later, we continue to hear from Marylanders needing assistance who have been unable to access their benefits or get answers from the Maryland Department of Labor (MDOL).”

They continue, “While we recognize that you must balance speed with preventing fraud and ensuring program integrity, Maryland has continued to lag behind other states and the national average in its distribution of benefits. In the first and second quarters of 2021, only 50.1% of first payments were made to Marylanders in 21 days, making Maryland one of the 10 slowest states to get benefits to claimants.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MD District 5 since 1981
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 US Senator
Former Position(s): State Senator from 1967 – 1978

Other Positions:  
House Majority Leader

Featured Quote: 
In the first 200 days of the 117th Congress, House Democrats have delivered results for Americans. Take a look at the significant legislative accomplishments that House Democrats have advanced during this Congress #ForThePeople:

Featured Video: 
Steny Hoyer Promotes ‘Help America Vote Act’ In Appropriations Bill

Source: Campaign page

News

WASHINGTON, DC – Today, Congressman Steny H. Hoyer, Senators Chris Van Hollen (MD)  and Senator Ben Cardin (MD), and Representatives Dutch Ruppersberger (MD-02), John Sarbanes (MD-03), Andy Harris (MD-01), Kweisi Mfume (MD-07), Anthony Brown (MD-04), Jamie Raskin (MD-08), and David Trone (MD-06) sent a letter to the Maryland Department of Labor (MDOL) pressing for answers regarding their delivery of unemployment benefits to Marylanders impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and urging the agency to expedite distribution of these crucial benefits. In their letter, the members stress the importance of a timely delivery of these benefits and request MDOL to provide data on the current status of benefits, including how many Marylanders have received payments, the amount of payments disbursed, the number of claims that are currently pending, and average turnaround time for adjudicating claims.

The members begin, “When the COVID-19 pandemic began in the United States, Congress acted quickly to provide expanded unemployment benefits to workers and administrative funding to states charged with processing UI claims and implementing these new assistance programs. However, many of our constituents dealt with delays and were unable to access their benefits. Almost a year and half later, we continue to hear from Marylanders needing assistance who have been unable to access their benefits or get answers from the Maryland Department of Labor (MDOL).”

They continue, “While we recognize that you must balance speed with preventing fraud and ensuring program integrity, Maryland has continued to lag behind other states and the national average in its distribution of benefits. In the first and second quarters of 2021, only 50.1% of first payments were made to Marylanders in 21 days, making Maryland one of the 10 slowest states to get benefits to claimants.”

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Steny Hoyer 1

Source: Government page

In the Fifth Congressional District, Congressman Steny H. Hoyer is a tireless fighter for economic development and a leader in creating jobs. He has helped create and save nearly 23,000 jobs by supporting federal facilities and associated businesses located in and around the Fifth District, including NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Patuxent River Naval Air Station, the Naval Surface Warfare Center at Indian Head, the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, the FDA at White Oak, and the future NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction in College Park.

He also works hard to protect our natural resources. In addition to supporting every major piece of environmental legislation while in Congress, he has co-sponsored numerous bills to protect the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries, including the “Chesapeake Bay Restoration Act.” He secured more than $10 million in the 1990s to respond to Pfiesteria and to study its effects on humans; helped secure more than $400 million in the 2008 Farm Bill to enable farmers to implement environmental best practices and reduce runoff into the Chesapeake Bay; and championed the efforts to replenish the declining oyster population of the Bay and to restore the Potomac, Patuxent and St. Mary’s rivers.

Congressman Hoyer works to meet the transportation needs of his constituents by securing funding to maintain and improve local roads, commuter bus systems, and the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA). He also works to keep local communities and the Washington region safe by fighting to fully fund Community Oriented Policing Services, the Assistance for Firefighters Grant Program, and upgrades for first responders’ communications systems.

Congressman Hoyer is also dedicated to outstanding constituent service. At offices in Washington, D.C., Greenbelt, and Waldorf, he and his staff help constituents cut through red tape and solve problems related to passports, immigration, government services, and a host of other issues.

A Record of Achievement

In Congress, Steny Hoyer has built an outstanding record of achievement and earned a reputation as a strong leader and an able legislator. In the 111th Congress, his skill at consensus-building helped the House pass important legislation to strengthen our economy and bring health coverage to an additional 4 million low-income children through the State Children’s Health Insurance Program. He has also been one of Congress’s leading voices for fiscal responsibility and a government that pays for what it buys, and he has spearheaded an effort to invest in creating new jobs in Maryland and across the country through Democrats’ Make It In America plan.

Congressman Hoyer shepherded the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) to overwhelming approval in the House in 1990. This landmark civil rights legislation, signed into law on July 26, 1990 by President George H.W. Bush, has helped millions of disabled Americans enter the workforce, achieve independence and go as far as their talents take them. In 2008, Congressman Hoyer also led the effort to pass the ADA Amendments Act, which allows millions of Americans with disabilities to benefit from the ADA’s original intent of inclusion.

Congressman Hoyer also gained wide acclaim for guiding the Help America Vote Act to House passage and producing a House-Senate Conference Report that was signed into law by President George W. Bush on Oct. 29, 2002. Washington Post columnist David Broder called this comprehensive election reform legislation “the most significant piece of election law since [the] Voting Rights Act.”

In addition, Congressman Hoyer drafted and helped secure passage of the Federal Employee Pay Comparability Act (FEPCA). FEPCA, which was signed into law in November 1990, was a major effort to restructure the pay system for Federal employees, which attempts to ensure fairness in pay and comparability to similar work outside the Federal government.

Congressman Hoyer also is a widely respected voice on foreign policy and international affairs. As the former Chair and Ranking Democrat on the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (the Helsinki Commission), he championed the cause of human rights, individual freedoms, democracy and religious liberties throughout the world. He called for decisive U.S. and NATO action to stop the carnage throughout the former Yugoslavia and condemned the repressive tactics of Afghanistan’s former ruling regime, the Taliban, and recognized the danger posed by that government before the terrorist attacks of September 11. He also has taken a very active role in urging international action to stop the genocide in Sudan, and in April 2007 led a Congressional delegation to Darfur. On May 21, 2009, Denmark honored Congressman Hoyer by making him a Knight of the Order of the Dannebrog.

Through his committee assignments and leadership positions, Congressman Hoyer has aggressively advocated for his Fifth District constituents and also is a respected voice on national and international issues. As a member of the Appropriations Committee from the time he took office until he entered the Congressional leadership, Congressman Hoyer has secured funding for numerous important projects in Calvert, Charles, Prince George’s, Anne Arundel, and St. Mary’s counties and throughout the State of Maryland. He also has worked to ensure that the military bases in the Fifth District not only survived base closings but grew and thrived.

On the Transportation, Treasury and General Government Appropriations Subcommittee, Congressman Hoyer became widely recognized as a national leader on issues affecting Federal employees and retirees. In addition to guiding FEPCA to passage, he fights year in and year out for fair pay and benefits for Federal employees, and he has secured funding for telecommuting centers that save money and reduce traffic congestion.

He also has been a strong proponent of Federal law enforcement efforts that fall within the Subcommittee’s jurisdiction, securing funding for innovative crime-fighting projects such as the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Program, Gang Resistance Education and Treatment Program, and the Youth Crime Gun Interdiction Initiative. In addition, he is a long-time supporter of the COPS on the Beat Program, which has meant more than $30 million in Federal funding to hire an additional 700 police officers in the Fifth District.

On the Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, Congressman Hoyer championed education and funding for the Class Size Reduction Initiative, Head Start, and teacher training programs. He has also been an advocate for increased funding for childhood immunization and for full-service community schools, which provide a range of important services for students, especially in early childhood years.

Congressman Hoyer is well-recognized for his efforts to make the House more efficient and “customer friendly.” As the former Ranking Democrat on the Committee on House Administration, which oversees the internal operations of the House, he played an important role on policy issues ranging from election reform and campaign finance reform to enhancing the security of the Capitol complex in the aftermath of September 11.

Leadership in Congress

As House Majority Leader for the 117th Congress, Congressman Hoyer is the second-ranking member of the House Democratic Leadership. He is charged with mobilizing the party vote on important legislation, acting as a liaison between Members and the Democratic Leadership, and coordinating strategy within the Caucus. He also plays a key role in shaping House Democrats’ legislative priorities and in delivering the Democratic message.

Congressman Hoyer’s experience, know-how, and strong work ethic have led to increasing responsibilities within the House Democratic leadership. He has served as House Majority Leader since 2019 – making him the highest-ranking Member of Congress from Maryland in history. Previously he served as the House Majority Leader from 2007 to 2011 and as House Democratic Whip from 2003 to 2007 and from 2011 to 2019. Prior to serving in his first term as Whip, Congressman Hoyer served as Chair of the Democratic Caucus – the fourth-ranking position among House Democrats – from 1989 to 1995. He is the former Co-Chair (and a current member) of the Democratic Steering Committee, and served as the chief candidate recruiter for House Democrats from 1995 to 2000. Congressman Hoyer also served as Deputy Majority Whip from 1987 to 1989. Now in his 21st term in Congress, he also became the longest-serving Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Maryland in history on June 4, 2007.

A Commitment to Public Service and the Fifth Congressional District

Congressman Hoyer attended Suitland High School in Prince George’s County, and in 1963 he graduated with high honors from the University of Maryland, selected “Outstanding Male Graduate” that year.  In 1966, he received his law degree from Georgetown University Law Center. That same year, at the age of 27, he won a seat in the Maryland Senate.

In 1975, he was elected President of the Senate, the youngest ever in state history, and served in that body until 1978. He was a member of the State Board of Higher Education from 1978 to 1981, the year in which he came to Congress after winning a special election.

Congressman Hoyer currently serves on the St. Mary’s College Board of Trustees. He also is a former member of the Board of Regents of the University System of Maryland and the United States Naval Academy Board of Visitors. Congressman Hoyer and his wife, the late Judith Pickett Hoyer, have three daughters: Susan, Stefany, and Anne; son-in-law Loren Taylor; grandchildren Judy, James Cleveland, and Alexa; and great-grandchildren Ava, Braedon and Brooklyn.

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Offices

Washington, DC Office
1705 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515
Phone – (202) 225-4131
Fax – (202) 225-4300


The staff in the Washington Office are available to take your calls and e-mails about legislative issues that are important to the constituents of the 5th District of Maryland. Open Monday through Friday except Federal Holidays—9 a.m. to 6 p.m. when Congress is in session, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. otherwise.

Northern Office
U.S. District Courthouse
6500 Cherrywood Lane, Suite 310
Greenbelt, MD 20770
Phone – (301) 474-0119
Fax – (301) 474-4697


The staff at the Northern District Office handles the constituent casework of Prince George’s, Anne Arundel, and Calvert Counties. Open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday except Federal Holidays.

Southern Office
4475 Regency Place, Suite 203
White Plains, MD 20695
Phone – (301) 843-1577
Fax – (301) 843-1331


The staff at the Southern District Office handles the constituent casework of Charles and St. Mary’s Counties. Open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday except Federal Holidays.

Majority Leader’s Office
H-107 The Capitol
Washington, D.C. 20515
Phone – (202) 225-3130
www.majorityleader.gov


The staff in the Leader’s Office manage Rep. Hoyer’s leadership responsibilities as the second-ranking Democrat in the House of Representatives. Open Monday through Friday except Federal Holidays—9 a.m. to 6 p.m. when Congress is in session, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

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Wikipedia Entry

Steny Hamilton Hoyer (/ˈstɛni ˈhɔɪ.ər/ STENN-ee HOY-ər; born June 14, 1939) is an American politician and attorney serving as U.S. Representative for Maryland’s 5th congressional district since 1981 and as House Majority Leader since 2019. A Democrat, he was first elected in a special election on May 19, 1981, and is currently serving in his 20th term. The district includes a large swath of rural and suburban territory southeast of Washington, D.C. Hoyer is the dean of the Maryland Congressional delegation and the most senior Democrat in the House.

Since 2003, Hoyer has been the second ranking Democrat in the House of Representatives behind Nancy Pelosi. He is a two-time House Majority Leader, having previously served in the post from 2007 to 2011 under Speaker Pelosi.[2][3] During two periods of Republican House control (2003–2007 and 2011–2019), Hoyer served as House Minority Whip, both times under Minority Leader Pelosi. As a result of the 2018 midterm elections, in which the Democrats took control of the House, Hoyer was re-elected Majority Leader in January 2019 on the opening of the 116th Congress, remaining the number two House Democrat behind Speaker Pelosi.[4][5]

Early life and education

Hoyer was born in New York City, New York, and grew up in Mitchellville, Maryland, the son of Jean (née Baldwin) and Steen Theilgaard Høyer. His father was Danish and a native of Copenhagen; “Steny” is a variant of his father’s name, “Steen”.[6] His mother was an American, with Scottish, German, and English ancestry, and a descendant of John Hart, a signer of the Declaration of Independence.[7] He graduated from Suitland High School in Suitland, Maryland.

In his early years at the University of Maryland College Park, Hoyer held a 1.9 grade point average. His attitude towards school and politics changed after hearing a speech from then Senator John F. Kennedy before his election in 1960.[citation needed] In 1963, Hoyer received his B.A. degree magna cum laude and graduated Omicron Delta Kappa from the University of Maryland, College Park. He was also a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity.[8] He earned his J.D. degree from Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C., in 1966.[8]

Early political career

For four years, from 1962 to 1966, Hoyer was a member of the staff of United States Senator Daniel Brewster (D-Maryland); also on Senator Brewster’s staff at that time was Nancy Pelosi, who would later become a leadership colleague of Hoyer, as she served as Minority Leader and Speaker of the House while he was Minority Whip and Majority Leader, respectively.[9]

In 1966, Hoyer won a newly created seat in the Maryland State Senate, representing Prince George’s County-based Senate district 4C.[10] The district, created in the aftermath of Reynolds v. Sims, was renumbered as the 26th district in 1975,[8][11] the same year that Hoyer was elected President of the Maryland State Senate, the youngest in state history.[12]

From 1969 to 1971, Hoyer served as the first vice president of the Young Democrats of America.[13]

In 1978, Hoyer sought the Democratic nomination for Lieutenant Governor of Maryland as the running mate of then acting Governor Blair Lee III, but he lost to Samuel Bogley 37%–34%.[14] In the same year, Hoyer was appointed to the Maryland Board of Higher Education, a position he served in until 1981.[8]

U.S. House of Representatives

An earlier congressional portrait of Hoyer.

Hoyer in 2007 as House Majority Leader

Elections

Fifth district Congresswoman Gladys Spellman fell into a coma three days before the 1980 election. She was reelected, but it soon became apparent that she would never regain consciousness, and Congress declared her seat vacant by resolution in February 1981. Hoyer narrowly won a crowded seven-way Democratic primary, beating Spellman’s husband Reuben by only 1,600 votes. He then defeated a better-funded Republican, Audrey Scott, in the May 19 special election by 56%–44%, earning himself the nickname of “boy wonder”.[15][16][17] In the 1982 general election, Hoyer won reelection to his first full term with 80% of the vote.[18] He has faced only one relatively close contest since then, when he defeated future Governor of Maryland Larry Hogan with just 53% of the vote in 1992.[19] His second worst performance was his 1996 bid against Republican State Delegate John Morgan, when he won reelection with 57% of the vote.[20] Hoyer has been reelected 14 times with no substantive opposition, and is the longest-serving House member ever from southern Maryland.[12]

Tenure

Domestic issues

Hoyer supports and has led on the Make It In America plan linking domestic manufacturing industry and overall US economic success.[21]

Hoyer is pro-choice on abortion rights.[22] He voted against the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act in 2003. Hoyer supports affirmative action and LGBT rights. Hoyer is rated F by the