Voting in MarylandVoting in Maryland

Federal & state elections on the ballot: US Senator, 7 US House members, Governor, Attorney General, State House and Senate members

Ballot measures:

The Maryland State Board of Elections oversees all Maryland elections.

Summary

Federal & state elections on the ballot: US Senator, 7 US House members, Governor, Attorney General, State House and Senate members

Ballot measures:

The Maryland State Board of Elections oversees all Maryland elections.

News

About

Twitter

Contact

Locations

State Board of Elections
151 West Street, Suite 200, Annapolis, MD 21401
Phone: (800) 222-8683

Web

State Board of Elections, Ballot measures, Twitter, Facebook

Registering to Vote

General Information

Who can register

To register in Maryland you must:

  • be a U.S. citizen
  • be a Maryland resident
  • be at least 18 years old by the next general election
  • not be under guardianship for mental disability
  • not have been convicted of buying or selling votes
  • not have been convicted of a felony, or if you have, have completed serving a court ordered sentence of imprisonment, including any term of parole or probation for the conviction

How to register

  1. Use our Register to Vote form below to fill out the National Voter Registration Form.
  2. Sign and date your form. This is very important!
  3. Mail or hand-deliver your completed form to the address we provide.
  4. Make sure you register before the voter registration deadline.

Election Day registration

  • You can register to vote in-person during early voting and on Election Day. You will need to bring your MVA-issued license, ID card, or change of address card, or a paycheck, bank statement, utility bill, or other government document that has your name and current address.

Voting Rights restoration

If you have been convicted of a felony and have questions about whether you can register to vote, visit Restore Your Vote to determine your eligibility.

Registration Status (form)

New Registration (form)

Voting

General Information

Voting as a Student

Learn more from Campus Vote Project about voting for students.

Overseas and Military Voting

You are a Military or Overseas voter if you are in uniformed services, living overseas OR a spouse or dependent of a uniformed services voter. To get registered and vote, you can utilize Overseas Vote Foundation.

If you have additional questions about elections and voting overseas you can use our state specific elections official directory or contact the Overseas Vote Foundation.

Voting with Disabilities

In-person Absentee Voting is available in Iowa beginning 40 days before an election. Voting takes place in the county auditor’s office.

You may vote absentee in-person until the day before Election Day, unless polling places open at noon on Election Day. In that case, you may vote absentee in-person from 8am-11am on Election Day.

Early Voting

Early voting starts the 2nd Thursday before election day and runs through Thursday before the election.

You can now register to vote at the early voting centers! In order to register at the center you must bring a document that proves where you live. Examples of acceptable documents are:

  • Maryland driver’s license or ID card
  • Change of address card
  • Paycheck
  • Bank statement
  • Utility bill
  • Other government document with your name and address

For Early Voting locations, please use your state’s resource or contact your local board of elections.

Vote by Mail (Absentee)

Absentee ballot rules

Any registered Maryland voter may apply for an absentee ballot and vote by mail.

How to get Absentee ballot

  1. Use our Absentee Ballot form below to prepare your application.
  2. Sign and date the form. This is very important!
  3. Return your completed application to your Local Election Office as soon as possible. We’ll provide the mailing address for you.
  4. All Local Election Offices will accept mailed or hand-delivered forms. If it’s close to the deadline, call and see if your Local Election Office will let you fax or email the application.
  5. Make sure your application is received by the deadline. Your application must actually arrive by this time — simply being postmarked by the deadline is insufficient.
  6. Please contact your Local Election Office if you have any further questions about the exact process.

What to do next

  • Once you receive the ballot, carefully read and follow the instructions.
  • Sign and date where indicated.
  • Mail your voted ballot back to the address indicated on the return envelope.
  • Your voted ballot must arrive by the deadline or it will not be counted.

Absentee ballot application deadline

By Mail: 7 days before Election Day.

Absentee ballot submission deadline

Postmarked on or before Election Day and received by 10am, 10 days after Election Day.

Absentee Ballot (form)

Elections Alert (Form)

Pollling Information

Polling Place Locator

You can find your polling place by utilizing your state resource.

If you have further questions on your polling place location, please contact your local board of elections.

Polling Place Hours

The polling place hours of operation are from 7:00 am to 8:00 pm.

Poll Worker Information

In order to be an Election Judge, you must be:

  • 16 years or older (if you are 16 you must have a parent or guardian permission)
  • Registered to vote in Maryland
  • Physically and mentally able to work at least a 15 hour day
  • Willing to work outside your home precinct
  • Able to sit and/or stand for an extended time
  • Able to speak, read and write English

You cannot be an election judge if you are a:

  • Candidate or currently holding public office
  • Chairman, campaign manager or treasurer for a political or candidate committee

Why should you be an election judge?

  • You will get paid
  • You will help voters
  • You are involved in the election process!

If you’d like to apply to becoming an election judge, click here.

State Board of Elections

The State Administrative Board of Election Laws was created in 1969 to ensure compliance with the requirements of Maryland and federal election laws by all persons involved in the election process. Thirty years later, under its new name of State Board of Elections (SBE) it continues its mission in collaboration with the County Boards of Election.

Board Members

The State Board of Elections is made up of five members who serve four-year terms and represent both principal political parties — three of the majority and two of the minority party. The members are appointed by the Governor, with the advice and consent of the Senate of Maryland.

The current board members are:

  • Michael R. Cogan (R), Chairman
  • Patrick J. Hogan (D), Vice Chairman
  • Malcolm L. Funn (D)
  • Kelley A. Howells (R)
  • William G. Voelp (R)

Bylaws of the State Board

These bylaws, adopted by the members of the Maryland State Board of Elections, provide the rules of governance for the board during the conduct of all duties assigned under State and federal laws and regulations. Further, these bylaws set a standard of personal conduct for members of the board requiring them to conduct themselves in accordance with high ethical standards in order to ensure the public that members are independent of partisan pressures and conflicting interests.

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2022 State Races2022 Elections
Who's in and Who's out for 2022 Governor's race
My MCM, Deirdre ByrneApril 29, 2021 (Short)

Candidates are starting to announce their candidacy for Maryland’s 2022 gubernatorial election. Maryland’s current governor, Larry Hogan (R), is ineligible to run for reelection due to term limits.

Here’s a look at who is in, who is out, and who is up in the air when it comes to putting their hat in the ring to try and become Maryland’s next governor.

The filing date to declare candidacy is Feb. 22, 2022. This post will be updated as candidates continue to declare their intention about whether or not to enter the race.

i

The 2022 United States Senate election in Maryland will be held on November 8, 2022, to elect a member of the United States Senate to represent the state of Maryland.

Incumbent Democratic Senator Chris Van Hollen has not yet announced whether or not he will seek a second term, although he has filed preliminary paperwork with the Federal Elections Commission.

Democratic primary candidates

Declared

  • Colin Byrd, mayor of Greenbelt
  • Michelle Laurence Smith

Filed paperwork

  • Jaden Thomas Farris
  • Chris Van Hollen, incumbent U.S. Senator

Republican primary candidates

Potential

  • Kim Klacik, community activist, member of the Baltimore County Republican Committee, and nominee for Maryland’s 7th congressional district in the 2020 special and general elections
  • Andy Harris, U.S. Representative for Maryland’s 1st congressional district (2011–present) (running for re-election)

Predictions

SourceRankingAs of
The Cook Political Report[8]Solid DJanuary 25, 2021
Inside Elections[9]Solid DApril 23, 2021
Sabato’s Crystal Ball[10]Safe DMarch 11, 2021

But having talked with Rutherford, DePuyt said, “His comments ring true when he talked about how his family was not on board with the rigors of a campaign, and then potentially four or eight years of additional years of service,” and all the demands that would bring.

Rutherford said his decision was not based on any competition from a growing GOP field for the 2022 contest. He also said having to appeal to the “Trump wing” of the Republican party was not a concern.

“There are some of course who jump on social media who are very vocal, but I think the majority of the party would have come around to support me if I decided to run,” he said

Famed political science professor Dr. Larry J. Sabato’s Crystal Ball, a nonpartisan political analysis and handicapping newsletter run by the University of Virginia Center for Politics, predicts Maryland’s next governor will be a Democrat.

The latest edition of Sabato’s often-quoted political newsletter analyzed the national gubernatorial landscape taking shape in 2022: “38 states will see gubernatorial races over the next two years; Democrats currently hold 18 of the seats that will be contested while the GOP holds 20,” writes J. Miles Coleman, the Center for Politics’ associate editor.

“Aside from Maryland, no statehouses are initially favored to flip — but surprises are surely coming,” predicts the Crystal Ball. Maryland, Coleman writes, “is the only state we see changing hands right off the bat.”

Rutherford Won’t Run for Governor in 2022
Maryland Matters, Bruce DePuyt April 14, 2021 (Short)

For more than six years, he has served as Maryland’s nose-to-the-grindstone lieutenant governor, the man perhaps best-positioned to offer himself to voters in 2022 as the logical heir to Gov. Lawrence J. Hogan Jr.’s legacy.

But Boyd K. Rutherford (R) has opted instead to “ride into the sunset” when he and the governor leave office 20 months from now.

In an interview with Maryland Matters on Tuesday, Rutherford said he lacked the burning desire necessary for the rigors of a campaign.

Josh Kurtz: Are Dems Overconfident About 2022 in Maryland?
Maryland Matters, Josh KurtzMarch 17, 2021 (Short)

The Maryland Democratic Party is giddy.

Two national political handicapping websites, The Cook Political Report and Sabato’s Crystal Ball, recently took early assessments of the 2022 political landscape and rated the Maryland gubernatorial election as a very good pickup opportunity for the Democrats. The state Democratic Party and the Democratic Governors Association last week sent out fundraising emails boasting about it.

Why wouldn’t political handicappers look at an open-seat gubernatorial election, one without the gravity-defying Lawrence J. Hogan Jr. (R) in it, and come away with that prediction? The political fundamentals of the state, which just gave President Biden 65.4% of the vote, demand it.

And why wouldn’t Democratic organizations broadcast the ratings? That’s what they’re supposed to do, to build interest and enthusiasm and raise a little dough.

News

Who’s in and Who’s out for 2022 Governor’s race
My MCM, Deirdre ByrneApril 29, 2021 (Short)

Candidates are starting to announce their candidacy for Maryland’s 2022 gubernatorial election. Maryland’s current governor, Larry Hogan (R), is ineligible to run for reelection due to term limits.

Here’s a look at who is in, who is out, and who is up in the air when it comes to putting their hat in the ring to try and become Maryland’s next governor.

The filing date to declare candidacy is Feb. 22, 2022. This post will be updated as candidates continue to declare their intention about whether or not to enter the race.

i

The 2022 United States Senate election in Maryland will be held on November 8, 2022, to elect a member of the United States Senate to represent the state of Maryland.

Incumbent Democratic Senator Chris Van Hollen has not yet announced whether or not he will seek a second term, although he has filed preliminary paperwork with the Federal Elections Commission.

Democratic primary candidates

Declared

  • Colin Byrd, mayor of Greenbelt
  • Michelle Laurence Smith

Filed paperwork

  • Jaden Thomas Farris
  • Chris Van Hollen, incumbent U.S. Senator

Republican primary candidates

Potential

  • Kim Klacik, community activist, member of the Baltimore County Republican Committee, and nominee for Maryland’s 7th congressional district in the 2020 special and general elections
  • Andy Harris, U.S. Representative for Maryland’s 1st congressional district (2011–present) (running for re-election)

Predictions

SourceRankingAs of
The Cook Political Report[8]Solid DJanuary 25, 2021
Inside Elections[9]Solid DApril 23, 2021
Sabato’s Crystal Ball[10]Safe DMarch 11, 2021

But having talked with Rutherford, DePuyt said, “His comments ring true when he talked about how his family was not on board with the rigors of a campaign, and then potentially four or eight years of additional years of service,” and all the demands that would bring.

Rutherford said his decision was not based on any competition from a growing GOP field for the 2022 contest. He also said having to appeal to the “Trump wing” of the Republican party was not a concern.

“There are some of course who jump on social media who are very vocal, but I think the majority of the party would have come around to support me if I decided to run,” he said

Famed political science professor Dr. Larry J. Sabato’s Crystal Ball, a nonpartisan political analysis and handicapping newsletter run by the University of Virginia Center for Politics, predicts Maryland’s next governor will be a Democrat.

The latest edition of Sabato’s often-quoted political newsletter analyzed the national gubernatorial landscape taking shape in 2022: “38 states will see gubernatorial races over the next two years; Democrats currently hold 18 of the seats that will be contested while the GOP holds 20,” writes J. Miles Coleman, the Center for Politics’ associate editor.

“Aside from Maryland, no statehouses are initially favored to flip — but surprises are surely coming,” predicts the Crystal Ball. Maryland, Coleman writes, “is the only state we see changing hands right off the bat.”

Rutherford Won’t Run for Governor in 2022
Maryland Matters, Bruce DePuyt April 14, 2021 (Short)

For more than six years, he has served as Maryland’s nose-to-the-grindstone lieutenant governor, the man perhaps best-positioned to offer himself to voters in 2022 as the logical heir to Gov. Lawrence J. Hogan Jr.’s legacy.

But Boyd K. Rutherford (R) has opted instead to “ride into the sunset” when he and the governor leave office 20 months from now.

In an interview with Maryland Matters on Tuesday, Rutherford said he lacked the burning desire necessary for the rigors of a campaign.

Josh Kurtz: Are Dems Overconfident About 2022 in Maryland?
Maryland Matters, Josh KurtzMarch 17, 2021 (Short)

The Maryland Democratic Party is giddy.

Two national political handicapping websites, The Cook Political Report and Sabato’s Crystal Ball, recently took early assessments of the 2022 political landscape and rated the Maryland gubernatorial election as a very good pickup opportunity for the Democrats. The state Democratic Party and the Democratic Governors Association last week sent out fundraising emails boasting about it.

Why wouldn’t political handicappers look at an open-seat gubernatorial election, one without the gravity-defying Lawrence J. Hogan Jr. (R) in it, and come away with that prediction? The political fundamentals of the state, which just gave President Biden 65.4% of the vote, demand it.

And why wouldn’t Democratic organizations broadcast the ratings? That’s what they’re supposed to do, to build interest and enthusiasm and raise a little dough.

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